Category Archives: Damage

Condo Roof Leak Creates Insurance Mess for Unit Owner

G.G. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Our condo roof is over 20 years old (I believe 23 years). Was already patched once when we first started getting water two weeks ago. With more rain it has begun to leak into the ceiling and wall in our kitchen/dining area (shared with a neighbor who currently isn’t having any water issues). The ceiling drywall was so saturated it began pouring into our unit through the seams of the drywall. We tore out the drywall. Damage appears to be very extensive. Our association doesn’t want to file a claim with their insurance. They called roofers (for the second time) to come patch the flat roof over the area. We called contractors for water damage out for an estimate. Who is going to pay for all of the damage? As of now it looks as though the wall behind our cabinets is damaged, cabinets are wet, and the subroof is also saturated and water is still pouring in. Since this wasn’t caused by a storm or anything we did as the unit owner, does that make the building/association liable?

Mister Condo replies:

G.G., I am sorry for your troubles. Water intrusion is a nasty, messy situation that requires professional help to remedy. Typically, your insurance would pay for the damage done to the interior of your unit. In fact, your insurer may be the ones who go after the Board to help pay for the damage, especially if it was caused by negligence to maintain. The Board is not under any obligation to submit an insurance claim. However, that does not free them from the responsibility of repairing the roof (which they did) and the possible claim against them for the damage caused to your unit. My best advice to you is to work with your insurer to collect as much money as possible to cover your loss. You might also want to involve an attorney to see what other legal rights or claims you may have against the association. My guess is that this might take some time to remedy but you will get your damage repaired without too much more than your deductible as an out of pocket expense. Good luck!

Who’s Responsible for Noisy Condo Air Conditioner in Newer Condo?

E.H. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I purchased a new condo in 2014. The HVAC unit is situated above my condo. Recently, the unit vibrated and produced a pounding sound such that I thought that there was a rock band playing on the roof! This pounding went on for four days. The vendor indicated that this vibration was caused by twin compressors that exchanged power from one to the other during the summer season to ensure that the HVAC system functions properly. This did not occur last summer. Because I was not told about this occurring when I purchased the condo, does it appear that I have any leeway in pursuing this issue with the builder.

Mister Condo replies:

E.H., I am not an attorney so I cannot offer any legal advice here. I am sorry for your problem but I am doubtful that you will have any success in pursuing this issue with the builder. Have you looked at the warranty for the air conditioner? Chances are that it is already out of warranty but you should still check. Next up is looking at solutions to the sound problem. You may need to have an HVAC engineer make suggestions and you may need the Board’s approval to implement any changes that will change the exterior appearance of the unit. Are you the only unit owner with this problem? If others are experiencing the same issue, it might make sense to coordinate the repairs / replacement of these noisy units. HVAC, like many technologies, advances at a rapid rate. Your 4 year-old unit may have a smaller, quitter, more efficient replacement that might just save you and other unit owners money for years to come. Good luck!

Neglected Condo Roof is Only the Tip of This Problem

M.L. from Massachusetts writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I’m in a condo association of two just outside Boston. We split common expenses 60(upstairs)/40(me). We need a new roof and upstairs neighbors are stalling and finally admitted they don’t have the money. This repair is long overdue and I am concerned that deferring could lead to damage. What are my options?

Mister Condo replies:

M.L., I am sorry for your problem. 2-unit condos like yours can be the perfect arrangement for some and a horror show for others. Your situation, I am afraid, is a bit of a horror show. I am not a lawyer and offer no legal advice here. However, I suggest you speak with an attorney from your area to see what other legal remedies you might have available to you. Your only real option, in my opinion, is to sue the other owner. But that won’t necessarily solve your problem seeing as you already know they don’t have the money. The truth is they can’t afford to live in this condo since they can’t shoulder the financial burden of doing so. In my opinion, your best bet is to sell and leave this problem to someone else. If you wish to fight the good fight and stay, you can either live with the problem roof or you can begin a lawsuit that will likely end in them losing their home through foreclosure and might still not get you the new roof you need. That is a very ugly, complicated, and nightmarish way to live for the next year or two that this would take to unfold. If it were me, I’d put my unit up for sale and spend my time and energy elsewhere. Good luck!

Upstairs Condo Neighbor Needs Downstairs Condo Neighbor’s Cooperation

P.K. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

My neighbor upstairs wants to renovate their bathroom to make it more accessible to their elderly father. She wants to change the plumbing and needs to come through my unit to do so. I am not really comfortable with this as my ceilings have recently been painted and plastered and I do not want a patch up after they drill holes in my unit. Not sure what to do.

Mister Condo replies:

P.K., I feel your pain. You want to be a good neighbor but you also want to protect your home and investment. There is no right or wrong answer here. If the governing documents don’t prohibit the type of modification your upstairs neighbors are seeking, this will largely come down to how cooperative you want to be. I guess my best advice is to ask yourself if the situation were reversed, how would you want your neighbor to respond. Typically, you can stipulate that the ceilings in your home will need to be left in the same condition they are currently in. In other words, if a patch job isn’t going to suffice, you can explain that you just had all of this work done. While you are willing to accommodate the construction, you expect more than just a “patch and paint” at the end of the project. If your neighbors are serious about needing/wanting their modifications, they may be willing to agree to you terms. After all, being a good neighbor works both ways. All the best!

Condo Radiant Flooring Failure Creates Big Problem

J.G. from Massachusetts writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

My condo had radiant floor heating. The heating split in the floor and is unable to be fixed. I have requested quotes from several different HVAC installers and they all have come up with a heating system that requires an outside condenser. My question is if the association says no to the condenser outside my unit what are my rights to having an affordable working heating system in my unit?

Mister Condo replies:

J.G., I am sorry to say that you would have almost no “rights” to installing a new HVAC unit on the association common grounds as it is owned by the association and not you. I have to question the lack of repair available to you and I would strongly suggest you contact other repair people who specialize in radiant floor heating. You are certainly well within your rights to petition the Board to allow for an HVAC installation outside of your unit. Are other units in your condo heated or cooled with external units? If so, you can argue that the precedent has been set and that you are simply doing what other unit owners have already done. In my experience, Boards aren’t likely to get in the way of an HVAC unit being installed where other units are already present. However, they may dictate that your new unit be like kind and model as others already on the grounds. This is their right under architectural compliance. My guess is you will either find a different repairman to fix your radiant floor heating system (ideal) or you will have the Board tell you which type of heating system they will allow or they will ask you to provide the specification for your installation and will either approve or deny based on the architectural compliance guidelines established for the association. All the best!

Condo Owner Suffers 9 Years Without Kitchen Hot Water!

K.D. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I have no hot water pressure in my kitchen. It is a building problem for several units and is on the “to do” list. I have asked about getting a reduced HOA fee as I am not receiving the same amenities as other condo owners. This has gone on for 9 years!!! Whenever I bring it up they assure me it is the next priority. Can I put my HOA payments in an escrow account until the problem is fixed?

Mister Condo replies:

K.D., I am sorry for your problems and your Board’s ineffective management of the repair. No, you cannot withhold your common fees or the Board can foreclose on your unit for unpaid fees over time. What you can do is sue the association for not providing the hot water. Ultimately, that will get you the hot water, which is what you really want here. Saving money on the common fees doesn’t help. Hot water will fulfill your expectation of what the association is supposed to provide. 9 years is far too long to wait. Speak to an attorney and see what you can do to get a lawsuit against the Board in place. They will likely find it less expensive to get your hot water running than to defend against a suit. Good luck!

Rattling in Ceiling Likely to be Association Responsibility

L.S. from Tolland County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

My condo has these metal strips above my ceiling sheetrock. When the tenant above me walks around, the squeaking noise is so bad – it is unbearable. The condo association is not taking responsibility for this – it is in many of the units at the complex. Being that it is above my ceiling – wouldn’t that be considered structural? I am being told that I have to remove my ceilings – HELP

Mister Condo replies:

L.S., I am sorry for your noisy ceiling problems. Seeing as the condo association did not actually build your unit (a developer did that a long time ago in all likelihood) your squeaking was very likely a pre-existing condition to your unit before you purchased. That doesn’t make it right or better but it may explain your association’s attitude towards your noise complaint. The way I see it, you have a few options here. First off, I am not an attorney and you should very likely speak to one to see if you have a case for a structural defect that would put the association on the hook for the remediation. Since you know of several other unit owners having the same problem, you might be able to join forces and sue the association and force them to take action. They may have a lawsuit against the developer or they may have insurance that would help them pay for it. Or, they may have to issue a Special Assessment to pay for the repairs if they are found liable. Keep in mind that you and your fellow unit owners will be the ones paying for these repairs in that situation but the expense will be equally shared by all unit owners, even those unaffected by the problem. Have you looked into the cost of removing your ceilings? Will your insurance help mitigate the cost? While I am in agreement with you that this is an association problem, if it is a cheap fix, you might want to tackle it yourself just to get some peace and quiet. This isn’t ideal but may prove more practical than the cost and time of a lawsuit. Finally, your other solution would be to simply sell and move. Again, not ideal, but it gets rid of your problem. However you finally solve this this noisy problem, I wish you all the best. Good luck!

Neighbor Damages Unit, Refuses to Pay for Repairs

L.W. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

A few months ago, a neighbor (a tenant – owner rents it out) attempted to make a change to the plumbing in his kitchen. It was done incorrectly, causing water to flow incessantly for several days into my garage which is below their kitchen. Water flowed all across the length of my ceiling (into the area where the air conditioning ducts are housed), and down the sides of the walls causing the sheet rock and insulation to be very soaked with water. I hired a painting and home improvement company who has done work for me and several others in this complex to get rid of all the water-soaked materials, and then to replace the materials once the area had time to dry out. It took them a several hours for several days to complete the work. It was done nicely, and I am satisfied with the work.

The problem is that the owner of the unit believes my contractor’s final price was too high – $750. I believe it was a fair and reasonable price. He is someone I trust, and he does good work. The owner paid half of that bill. I believe he should be the rest. He (by allowing his tenant to perform unlicensed plumbing work) endangered not only my unit, but those nearby. If I had not been home and noticed the leaking in my garage (the tenants were away for the week), the damage may have been disastrous.

Do you have any ideas on how to get this unit owner to pay the rest of the bill? I am considering Small Claims Court if he doesn’t pay within the next few weeks.

Mister Condo replies:

L.W., I am sorry for your problems. Typically, when a unit owner damages another owner’s unit, their insurance or even the association’s insurance is used to handle the repair of the damaged area. Since you took it upon yourself to handle the damage repair, you may be on the hook to collect from the other unit owner (or their insurance). Personally, I like your “take charge” common sense approach to getting the repair handled in timely fashion. However, now you may need to take your neighbor to Small Claims court to get your money back. Honestly, it sounds to me like you got an exceptional price for the work but your “shoot first, ask questions later” approach is receiving pushback from your neighbor. You might want to run the information past an attorney to see if you have a legal leg to stand on. Also, since the neighbor has already drawn a line in the sand at $375, you may need to ask yourself how much aggravation you are willing to suffer to recover the extra $375. You might just want to write this one off and pay attention to what happens the next time and hope that there isn’t a next time. All the best!

Plumbing Contractor Soaks Condo Unit Owner with Surprise Bill

J.C. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I recently had a slow leak from a pipe in my ceiling. I own a lower unit and asked the condo association to send someone out to determine the source of the leak. It was determined that the leak came from the pipe coming off my hot water heater. I opted to have the repairs done by a private contractor. I later received an invoice from the contractor who investigated the leak for $1700 listing mold remediation as the cause for up charge. I am currently disputing the charges as I did not request remediation and I was not notified of the increased charge prior to the work being completed. I received a letter from the condo association demanding that I pay within 10 days as the master policy says that I am responsible for repairs of non-common areas up to $5k. My state’s home improvement commission suggested I file civil suit. Am I wrong in disputing the charge? Should I just pay the $1700?

Mister Condo replies:

J.C., I am sorry for your situation. I am not an attorney so I cannot offer legal advice here but I will offer you some friendly advice. If my state’s home improvement commission suggested that I file a civil suit, I would seek out the advice of a locally qualified attorney to investigate the practicality of such a suit. $1700 is a significant chuck of change and a lawsuit might make sense. On the flipside, if the money isn’t so precious to you, simply paying the balance due will make this problem go away. My other advice is that should you find yourself in a situation where you need to hire a contractor for any other work, get a full estimate in advance. You should never get a $1700 surprise at the end of the job. You hired this contractor (which assumes a contract was in place). If unauthorized work was performed, a lawsuit might just get you out of the extra money. However, protecting your home against mold is a great idea and proper procedure. You may have agreed to have the work done without explicitly getting a price. As they say, burn me once, shame on you. Burn me twice, shame on me. Enjoy your mold-free dry home!

Falling Tree Damages Condo Visitor’s Car

C.B. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I was visiting a friend in the Condo and a tree (huge part of it) fell on my car, cause many damages. Can I have the right to sue the Condo for pay the deductible of my insurance? The general manager didn’t go there to see the damage and, on the phone, he just said that the homeowner’s association does not have insurance so he’s not going to pay for it. The deductible is $500 and my car is 2016.

Mister Condo replies:

C.B., I am sorry that your car got damaged. The right to sue another individual or business is yours if you choose to pursue it. However, the cost of suing this condo association for the $500 deductible on your insurance policy will most likely outweigh the potential of collecting the $500 from the association. This is part of the risk of having deductibles on our insurance. Clearly, this was not your fault but your insurance policy is only going to pay for the amount of damage that exceeds your deductible. The rest is on you. You can speak with an attorney if you would want to see if there is any other avenue open to you but my advice would be to simply pay your deductible. Otherwise, you are likely throwing good money after bad. All the best!