Category Archives: Governance

Neighboring Association Trash Dumpster Intrusion

T.P. from Chicago writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

The neighboring condo association has had their 2 garbage bins on our property for the last 6 years. I’ve always had a problem with that because, 1) they don’t maintain the area, I do, and 2) the liability of a “slip and fall” happening on our property by our neighbors or their trash removal company. I recently asked them to move the bins and was told “no”. Can I contact their trash removal company and have them move the bins? What other options do I have? Thank you from a Chicago Condo Board President.

Mister Condo replies:

T.P., unless there is some kind of agreement between the two properties, the neighboring association has no business intruding on your private property. This is a simple matter for your association attorney to remedy via lawsuit. Quite simply, the trash contractor is trespassing on your property. A “cease and desist” order should do the trick. If not, your association attorney can direct you to the next steps. You tried the easy was with the request for them to stop. They didn’t comply so it is time to escalate the situation. Good Luck!

Previous Condo Board Failed to Incorporate New Rule

B.R. from Maine writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

A condo board passes a new rule but fails to incorporate it into the existing list of rules & regulations. Board members change. New Board finds the ‘changed’ rules in a review of minutes. Are these changed rules still valid or were they terminated when they weren’t published in the rules & regs?

Mister Condo replies:

B.R., the vote on the rule change stands, in my opinion. If the seated Board had the authority to create the new rule and passed it properly, I don’t see why it would be invalid. It isn’t enforceable until it is properly incorporated into the governing documents and unit owners are notified, so it is basically unenforceable until that is done. And, like any rule, the current Board can rescind or modify or remove it. It really comes down to the practicality of implementing the rule after all this time. The current Board should decide to either adopt it and incorporate it or repeal it and let it go away. All the best!

Board Dragging Heels on Simple Repair Project

K.W. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Condo association has accepted responsibility to fix a pipe in a carport roof that freezes in low temperatures. It paid an engineer to recommend a fix. However, it has failed for 2 years to initiate a repair and will not give me the engineer’s report. My attorney has demanded action but has received no response. What can I do?

Mister Condo replies:

K.W., I think you are already doing all you can do. You have hired an attorney who will look out for your best interest in this matter. Since the association has acknowledged ownership of the problem, there really isn’t too much else you can do. Any idea what the delay is? Is it an expensive repair? My guess is they are just going to wrap the pipe in insulation and try not to make it too unsightly. Unless there is more to this story, I am not sure why it is taking them two years to handle this simple matter. Keep on top of your attorney and the Board to make sure the project gets done. Other than that, follow your attorney’s advice. Good luck!

Condo Board Passes Along Leak Inspection Fee to Unit Owner

J.B. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

The unit below our condo reported a ceiling leak to the HOA maintenance. The maintenance personnel looked at the leak, performed a moisture test, then asked to go into our unit. He identified our kitchen faucet as leaking and told us to fix it. We replaced the leaking faucet. The HOA then sent us a $90 bill for his “investigation services”. Are we responsible for his service?

Mister Condo replies:

J.B., most likely, yes. Your unit was found liable. It is not uncommon for the association to pass along expenses they incur that are attributable to a particular unit. On the upside, $90 isn’t very much money compared to the thousands of dollars that such a leak could have caused. I would pay the $90 and be thankful the leak didn’t cause more damage. Good luck!

Board Attempts to Reassign Limited Common Element Responsibility to Unit Owners

A.F. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

On the limited common area behind my home, a tall retaining wall runs behind 4 of the 48 cottages in our condo development. The Board of our POA wants to reassign responsibility for a portion of that wall to each of us. Two problems: it is a retaining wall, which is a structural support for our homes, plus my insurance agent says that homeowners and liability policies sold to condo owns do NOT cover any thing in or on limited common or common areas. Can the board assign responsibility for something that homeowners cannot insure for?

Mister Condo replies:

A.F., the Board can try and you can fight back with a lawsuit if necessary. While I have no particular knowledge of your governing documents or your state’s laws on common interest real estate, I sincerely doubt the Board can legally reassign any common element, limited or otherwise, to an individual or group of individual unit owners. Such a change, if possible, would likely require a supermajority of unit owners to agree and would basically require a rewriting of the incorporation and governing documents. Neither of these is easy and would involve the services of an attorney specialized in common interest communities. I offer no legal advice in this column but I would strongly suggest you speak with a locally qualified attorney to seek legal advice should the Board decide to push through this measure. All the best!

Rats in the Condo Attic; Rats on the Condo Board!

J.S. from California writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I live in a 100+ unit condominium development in California. My question is whether the current board is under any obligation to correct mistakes made by a past board? Specifically, a past board denied my request to do work clearly in the common area as defined in our CC & R’s. That area is the attic above our unit where there was significant rat infestation. The board authorized the pest control company that we have on annual contract to close out all the openings allowing the rats into the attic and to remove all dead rats and rat traps. The board refused to remove the fouled attic insulation, clean the attic and replace the insulation. The local county Vector Control District recommended the clean-up and insulation replacement to protect us and our downstairs neighbor (there is a fresh air make-up duct to her unit from our attic) from possible contamination of virus, etc.. Our general contractor (we were having a lot of remodeling done including plumbing, electric and HVAC all of which required workers in the attic space) refused to begin the remodeling until the attic was properly cleaned to protect his workers. After finding out much more about the past boards’ and current boards’ position on repairing damage in units (they have been paying to restore, repair, replace damaged items from water leaks even if those items are in the “unit” and not contained in the common area, an act specifically against rules in our CC & R’s) I resubmitted a request reimbursement for the cost to clean out the attic and replace the insulation which I had done at my cost after the past board had denied the request to pay for the work. The current board is waffling on whether to reimburse me or not fearing that they should not open a can of worms and reverse a previous board. Doesn’t the fact that we are a California corporation require the current board to correct a past board’s mistake when that mistake is brought to their attention? Doesn’t the corporate responsibility to act in accordance with the CC & R’s continue regardless of which board is in place? Thank you.

Mister Condo replies:

J.S., I am sorry for all of your problems. Rat infestations and the resulting potential for hazardous conditions is no laughing matter and the failure of the previous boards to take corrective action is appalling. However, the sins of the father are not necessarily vested upon the son in the form of the current Board. You should have sued the association for not taking the proper action back when the infestation and resulting damage was going on. You were not authorized by the Board to pay for the attic cleaning and insulation replacement. In fact, since you do not own that space, you really shouldn’t have done that. That being said, I would have done the same thing under those conditions rather than risk my own health due to an incompetent Board. So where does that leave you now? Obviously, the good news is that you have remediated the damage and are living in a healthy environment. You have asked the Board to reimburse you for the work and while I agree with you that they should, they are correct in that it sets a dangerous precedent of having unit owners handle repairs that the Board is responsible for and then obligating the Board to reimburse the unit owner for the work. Quite simply, that is not how things work in a condo. When common elements are damaged, the association needs to make the repair, putting them in control of hiring the contractor, negotiating terms, etc. You usurped that process when you took care of the problem on your own. Had a previous Board authorized your action, then it would be as simple as you submitting your receipts for reimbursement. Instead of asking permission, you now need to beg forgiveness. The Board is under no obligation that I am aware of to pay you back so ask politely. If the dollar amount is large enough, you might wish to speak to an attorney to see if it is worth pursuing. Otherwise, see what the Board does, hope for the best, and be happy that you have a rodent and disease-free living space. All the best!

This Condo Has it All! Renters, Roaches, Broken Trash Chutes…

S.M. from Miami writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I live in a condo in Miami and we have the most incompetent Board. The building is self-managed and we currently are under a lot of problems, like roach infestation, water leaks, building trash chute compartment broken and trash coming out of the compartment. The building runs more like an AirBnB. The rental ratio is at 61% and we have no support since there’s so many investors. Please advise, I have approached the Florida Department but they don’t intervene in situations like this.

Mister Condo replies:

S.M., it sounds like your association has really gotten away from what unit owners like you were expecting. Whether the Board is incompetent or not, without rental caps (the percentage of units allowed to be rented at any given time), I am not surprised to hear of so many rental units being used in AirBnB fashion. First things first. The Association is governed by volunteer leaders elected by the membership. If these leaders aren’t making sure that the problems are being addressed (water leaks, roaches, broken trash chutes) then it is time to elect new leaders. You may be able to bring suit against the association for not maintaining itself but that can be costly and still not yield any real results. If it were me, I would consider running for the Board myself on a platform of restoring the association to good working order. If that seems unreasonable, I would consider selling. It seems there is no shortage of investors looking to purchase into this association. I would look carefully at the next association I purchased into. Hopefully, the percentage of investment units would be far lower and the Board would do a better job of maintaining the common elements. Good luck!

Condo Manager Claims Unit Owners Cannot Assist Someone Who Falls

J.T. from Texas writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

A lady trips and falls on condo grounds and just needs assistance to stand up but no one will help her. The condo manager says it’s against the bylaws. We have the Good Samaritan law in Texas so I don’t understand why no one can help. What do you think?

Mister Condo replies:

J.T., what litigious times we live in that we cannot help our fellow man when they need our assistance for fear of a lawsuit! I would ask the condo manager to show you where it says no one can help someone who has fallen on the common grounds. My guess is that this is a misunderstanding of how the insurance regulations read about “slip and fall” type accidents. The insurer may insist that people who fall get medical evaluations to protect the insurer in the event of a lawsuit after the fact. That being said, it is very sad that we are being told not to help a fellow human being. If it were me, I would help and I would certainly want someone to help me or a loved one if they fell. Get the clarification you need and always practice kindness. This world is a negative place without it. All the best!

Irresponsible Dog Owner Concerns Condo Residents

L.H. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

We are senior citizens who have filed 10 complaints about a resident who does not leash his German Shepherd dog in the common areas, e.g., hallways, elevator, garage. We live in the same building as this resident. The CCR’s require all dogs to be on a leash. The HOA stated the attorney is working on our issue. They have yet to levy a fine on this resident. It has been 8 months and the resident is verbally abusive to us. What can we do?

Mister Condo replies:

L.H., I am sorry that you have such an irresponsible pet owner in your association. Honestly, it sounds like you can do all you can do. Once the association attorney is involved, it is up to the Board and the attorney to take the next steps. Hopefully, this dog will not attack you or any other unit owner before the dog’s owner leashed the dog and follows the rules. Sometimes, you just get a jerk living in an association. This is one of those times. If the verbal abuse continues, call the police. Protect yourself as best you can. My guess is that the attorney’s involvement will help correct the situation. Good luck!

Unit Owner Pissed Off at Condo Board Over Dog Urine Remediation

K.R. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I just purchased a unit that was a short sale. It had visible dog urine damage. The board was aware of this unit’s condition. After removing the carpeting and padding there is wet sub floor and wet framing from the dog urine. I am replacing the sub floor and some insulation as the dog urine seeped through the abutting sub floor and caused damage to some of the insulation as well. I received a note from one of the board members saying I need their permission to do any work in my unit. I read my bylaws and I own the subfloor. Why would I need permission to replace the sub floor or even update my kitchen cabinets? Does the board really have this much control over my home? What about my quiet enjoyment? What does CIOA have to say about this situation? Thank you for your anticipated response.

Mister Condo replies:

K.R., I am sorry for all of your problems. I hope you have been able to fully remediate the issue and get your unit in a livable condition. As to your interaction with the Board regarding repair and restitution work, I have a few thoughts to share. The ownership of the subfloor is not in question; it’s yours. Most associations require unit owners to inform them of any modifications to their units (including restoration) and for good reason. For starters, you may have contractors coming on to the property. These folks need to be licensed and insured and you may need to provide proof of same to the association. Second, depending on the nature of the repairs and/or upgrades, the Board has to make sure you aren’t working on any supporting walls or structures. Finally, if the association’s insurance policy is “all in” coverage, any upgrades you made need to be reported to the insurance company so they are covered. CIOA doesn’t come in to play with any of these issues as far as I know. Living in a community association means playing by the rules. My guess is once you have finished this project, you won’t have anything further to report or ask permission of the Board. All the best!