Category Archives: Insurance

Exterior Rot on Condo Leads to Interior Water Intrusion

R.S. from Missouri writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I am a condo unit owner for 13 years. I recently experienced my third interior damage leak from rotted siding and decades old flashing. Would the HOA be responsible for the cost of these repairs? My monthly common includes maintenance of the exterior of the unit. Thank you!

Mister Condo replies:

R.S., I am sorry that you have had three different water intrusion events that have caused damage to your unit’s interior. I hope you have homeowner’s insurance to help you mitigate against the losses. It would appear that your condo isn’t being maintained as well as it might if you are experiencing rotted siding. Properly installed flashing may last decades but not if water is getting in behind the flashing. The Board of Directors is charged with maintaining, protecting, and even improving the common elements of the association as outlined in your condo documents. They are also responsible for putting in place a strong fiscal plan that includes building up association Reserves for the eventual replacement of common elements. Have they done that? Is there money in the Reserve Fund to pay for the needed repairs? If not, this problem is only going to get worse as further deferred repairs will lead to more decay and more water intrusion events as you have described. It may be time to have a heart to heart with the Board and fellow unit owners. It may be time for a community association loan to make these repairs and it is most certainly time to raise common fees so that a Reserve Fund can be built for future repairs. This may mean that common fees will rise significantly but if there is no Reserve Fund, they have been artificially low for too long. The HOA is responsible to repairs made to the exterior of the unit. You are responsible for repairs made to the interior, even if they are caused by neglectful maintenance by the association. That is why you have to have insurance for these losses. It’s time to get your condominium association back on track financially or these claims are going to become larger and much more frequent. Let’s hope it doesn’t come to that. Good luck!

Condo Insurance Payment Made to Unit Owner for Building Damage

S.V. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

There was damage to the outside of our building. Insurance check was made payable in the name of a condo owner, who is the brother of president of condo association, in the amount of $6,000.00. I could not get an answer from either party and the insurance company why this was not made out to the condo association. Was this legal? I don’t know how the money was spent. This was several years ago. Is there a statute of limitations?

Mister Condo replies:

S.V., that is a strange way of processing an insurance claim at a condominium. However, it is not unheard of and without a full review of the insurance and the claim, it would be very difficult to prove whether anything illegal occurred. In fact, the insurance company would more likely be the one to have a claim if they were defrauded out of money. Was the building damage repaired? Was there further money paid for the repair by the association that the insurance should have covered? If there were no additional monies paid out by the association and the damage was repaired, it is probably best to stop worrying about it. I am not aware of a statute of limitations for you to investigate and/or file a complaint with your association on how the insurance money was distributed but to what end? If you weren’t harmed financially, this is really an item for the insurance company to worry about, not you. All the best!

Condo Has to Purchase its Own Clubhouse!

L.P. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

When many of the first purchasers bought from the condo developer they were told that one condo unit on the first floor would be the owners’ clubhouse/fitness center. At some point (I’m unsure of when since I’m a new owner) the documents given to purchasers said that the clubhouse condo was owned by the developer and could, at some future time be sold. Now the building is nearly sold out and being turned over to the owners. The board is asking the current condo owners as to our interest in purchasing the “clubhouse” condo to ensure that the building continues to have this amenity. All of this is very early; we have an attorney who would negotiate the best price for us. However, I’m wondering what questions the owners should ask the board before they go further. Obviously, the price, how we would be assessed and for how long are questions but are there other considerations?

Mister Condo replies:

L.P., while it is unfortunate that the clubhouse/fitness center was not included as part and parcel of the development, I cannot say this is an uncommon practice. It sounds like the developer used a “bait” tactic of enticing early owners into thinking that there would be an amenity of a clubhouse/fitness center as part of their purchase but I am guessing no one has anything like that in writing. Again, this is not uncommon from stories I have been told from around the country. The unit owners will likely have to vote to add this common amenity to the association. Since it is almost certain that the unit owners will want this amenity, it is wise to work with the attorney to handle the negotiation. Aside from the purchase itself, you might want to ask about staffing requirements (if any) and insurance repercussions to the association from adding the amenity. There is also the issue of purchase and maintenance of fitness equipment, hours of operation, open to the public or just unit owners (or guests). Will it be rented out and to whom? The Reserve Study should be updated to reflect the new building and all costs should be considered. Like I said, it is likely to go through any way but I think it would be helpful for unit owners to know exactly what they are buying and what the real costs of owning it are going to be. Enjoy your new clubhouse!

Ownership of Burst Condo Water Line Questioned

T.G. from New Haven County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

If a hot water line bursts in an outside wall who is responsible, the unit owner or the board? Also, the line was not where the Board said it was. Our kitchen sits above our neighbor’s garage. The board said both hot and cold lines are in the ceiling of the garage.

Mister Condo replies:

T.G., typically when water lines burst it is the responsibility of whoever owns the area where the line has broken. In other words, if you own from the wall in, a line that breaks outside of your walls is very likely the responsibility of the association. Regardless of what the Board says about it, a reading of your documents will very likely clear this up. If, by chance, the documents don’t appear to provide you with a good answer, it is time to speak to an attorney who can read any “legalese” that might make a simple determination possible. There are exceptions, of course. I know of some associations that have allowed modification of water lines at owner’s requests and along with the approval to do so came the responsibility to maintain the water lines. This is highly unusual though and does not sound like your situation. If you do own all of the interior walls where the water line burst (garage ceiling is a good example, a bathroom supply line would be another) then you may be on the hook for the repair. Like I said, when the unit owner and the Board don’t agree, it is usually time for a legal opinion. Good luck!

Condo Maintenance Standards vs. By-Laws

J.J. from New Haven County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I have heard that maintenance standards overrides the bylaws. If so, what is stopping associations from just putting in what they want rather than changing the bylaws, which is very costly?

Mister Condo replies:

J.J., maintenance standards are generally enacted to ensure the community association insurance policies will protect the unit owners. Maintenance standards, or rather lack of, makes the association particularly vulnerable to damage caused by items that commonly wear quickly. Water supply hoses and water heaters come to mind. When either fail, tremendous damage can ensue. Without maintenance standards in place, the association could find itself uninsured for the liability. That being said these standards are still introduced and voted upon by either the Board or the full membership of the association before they are put in place. By-laws cover so many other areas of association governance that it is hardly fair to put them in the same category as maintenance standards. You couldn’t simply make a rule about something like “use of the clubhouse” and call it a maintenance standard. That would be a by-law change. Other associations feel that maintenance standards are important enough to actually create a by-law change. Either way, unit owners are bound to these standards once they are properly adopted. It is in the best interest of all association members that these standards are in place and enforced. All the best!

Condo Insurance Check Issued to Unit Owner for Building Damage

S.F. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Insurance check for house damage was made payable to a condo owner, who is the brother of the president of the condo association. Why did the insurance company allow this? Check amount was substantial, for several thousand dollars.

Mister Condo replies:

S.F., there are a few reasons that the condo owner was reimbursed directly for an insurance claim. For starters, the policy holder typically designates the payee. Was this entirely association-owned insurance or was it homeowner’s insurance as well? Typically, the homeowner gets paid for claims made against their own policy. If the damage had already been repaired by the homeowner, the check may have been for reimbursement. A typical association claim for exterior building damage would go to the association, who would then hire the contractor to repair the exterior building damage. It the damage were internal (water damage for instance) and the association’s insurance were covering that damage, it would not be uncommon for the payment to go directly to the homeowner.

Keep in mind that insurance claims are also records of the association. As such, you have the right to inspect the claim. If you think foul play is afoot, I would suggest you review the paperwork to determine why the payment went to the owner and not the association. Good luck!

Condo Roof Leak Causes $75K in Damage; No Insurance Claim Made

J.T. from Middlesex County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Condo roof leak caused mold and extensive repairs paid by unit owner. The association refuses to pay the bill. $75,000.00 and never contacted master insurance but stated in emails that they did during initial assessments by environmental specialists provided by association who stated the need for immediate repairs. What is my next step?

Mister Condo replies:

J.T., you have a few different issues here. If it were me, my next step would be to contact an attorney to find out who I should sue for the $75,000 repair. That is a lot of money to be out of pocket for a roof leak and mold remediation. Of course, there is a procedure and protocol to follow here so don’t expect this to be a necessarily easy battle. Let’s start with the roof leak. Did the association fix the roof leak? That is their duty, regardless of whether insurance covers it or not. The association should have had insurance to fix the roof and made a claim to cover the cost or repair and any damage to any common elements. The association should have hired the contractor to make the repair. Is that what happened? You didn’t pay for the roof repair, did you?

Damage to your unit’s interior should have been covered by your own policy. If you didn’t have a homeowner’s policy in place, you should have and you should definitely have one in place moving forward. If the repairs were made in timely fashion, the mold issue may have been averted as most clean-up efforts would have included a dry-out of the damages area. However, as is often the case with mold, it doesn’t appear until months later. Regardless of how it got there, mold remediation is necessary because it can be toxic and, at the very least, a health hazard. If the mold can be determined to have been caused by the roof leak, the association may be on the hook for that as well. You should talk to an attorney about the mold issue to see who is responsible.

Again, I am not sure as to how you amassed a $75,000 bill for this problem, J.T.. If it was a lack of insurance on your part, this is going to be an expensive lesson on why you should always carry homeowner’s insurance. If it was simple mishandling of the claim by the association, an attorney can best advise you of your next steps. I hope you get the mold remediation taken care of immediately. All the best!

Condo Association-Hired Contractor Damages Unit Owner Ceilings

D.R. from Hartford County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

A unit owner notified the condo association of a roof leak. A contractor, called by the association to inspect and give an estimate, caused several cracks in the ceiling while up in the attic inspecting, even though he was told the attic had no floor. Who is responsible for the repair, the contractor and his insurance or the Condo association insurance. The condo insurance company said they are not involved.

Mister Condo replies:

D.R., what an unfortunate situation. I am actually surprised that this contractor didn’t fall through the ceiling, which would have caused an even bigger problem for the association and perhaps even caused injury. The association hired the contractor to handle the inspection. Regardless of what the contractor was told, his actions caused the damage as reported by you. Typically, the association should go after the contractor for the damage he caused. Typically, that would have the contractor calling his insurance company to file a claim. It sounds to me like that didn’t happen. Instead, someone initiated a claim with the condo insurance who has subsequently denied the claim as it wouldn’t typically be covered by the type of insurance most associations have for their buildings. In fact, you have stated that the damage was caused by the contractor.

Without knowing all of the details, I would suggest the association needs to go after the contractor they hired and have the contractor make good on the damage he caused. If his insurance will cover it that should be a fairly simple process. If his insurance will not cover it, he should pay out of pocket for the damage. If he won’t do that, the association should sue him for the damage and make good on the repairs for unit owners. If all else fails, unit owners may have to sue the association for hiring the contractor that caused the damage. Sounds like everyone has to do what’s best for them in this situation although the legal fees could quickly outweigh the actual cost of repair. Good luck!

Florida Condo Homeowners Insurance Requirement

V.B. from Florida writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I’ve lived at my condo in Orlando since 2009, when it was vetoed that unit owners are required to have insurance for condo. Are unit owners required to have condo insurance?

Mister Condo replies:

V.B., I am not an expert in Florida community association law so please consider this a friendly answer and not a legal one. You may wish to check with a local attorney for a legal opinion. Generally speaking, unit owners should have a homeowner’s insurance policy at the very minimum, regardless of requirement, to protect themselves from potential losses. Many association governance documents require unit owners to hold such policies but I am not aware of any legislation that requires unit owners to hold policies. In fact, my understanding of the Florida Condominium Act is that it does not require the insurance but it does state that the interior damage is the unit owner’s responsibility. As long as it is unit owner responsibility, the unit owner should want to have that risk insured, regardless of the law. That being said, if your original documents did call for a requirement to carry the insurance and the association voted to discontinue that requirement, there may, in fact, be no requirement for unit owners to do so. However, most mortgage companies would have a requirement for the unit owner to carry homeowner’s insurance and it is certainly a best practice to do so.  All the best!

Condo Maintenance Standards Enforcement

R.P. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

How common is it for Condominiums to have and enforce Maintenance Standards, whereby Unit owners are suggested / told how they should maintain their units to avoid issues or problems?

Mister Condo replies:

R.P., since the Common Interest Ownership Act (a/k/a CIOA) was passed in our state in 2011, maintenance standards have become quite common. Without issuing and adhering to maintenance standards, association open themselves and their members to denied insurance claims for items that commonly wear. If these standards are ignored by unit owners, they could find themselves on the hook for any damage that occurs due to a neglected item on the list. Among the more common culprits are water heaters. If a water heater failed outside of its useful life as determined by the maintenance standard and then flooded several units, the unit owner of the neglected water heater could be sued for the full amount of damages. Another common culprit is water supply lines for toilets and washing machines. They need to be replaced within the maintenance standard window or any damage caused if they fail would likely not be covered under the association’s insurance. I hope you don’t have any such failures. Good luck!