Delinquent Owner Causing Big Mess at 3-Unit Condo

S.B. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I live in a 3-unit condo that was converted from a single-family home 2 decades ago. When I closed on my condo, I was required to give the HOA a sum of money to cover my share of an estimated driveway repaving that was planned in a year (I have this in writing in my P&S and the closing papers). Before that could happen, and almost right after I moved in, the roof sprung a leak. Being tapped out on my recent purchase, I told the Trustee they could use half the money I put in for the driveway and I would pay half out of pocket for my share for the roof; when time came for the driveway in the next year, I would pay the difference. As it turned out, my half share of the roof and the whole share of the driveway amounted almost perfectly to what I put in at Closing. Now that it’s time, I’ve been asked to pay the whole amount of my share for the driveway out of pocket. The Trustee is saying she used the rest of my sum to cover a unit that couldn’t pay for the roof (they’re on a payment plan but it’s going to take them 2 years to pay the HOA back!). I asked if I would be reimbursed and was told no. I’m arguing that I was assessed at Closing and paid my share. She’s arguing that once the money went into the HOA reserves it became common funds for her to use as she saw fit. Can she really make me pay twice and not reimburse me given that the offending unit is paying back the funds albeit slowly?

Mister Condo replies:

S.B., ouch! Small condos like yours can have some mighty big problems when unit owners don’t have the money to sustain maintenance and repair items equally and as outlined in the governance documents. You may very well have the right to sue your association to get your money back but the real question is one of value. Would it be worth it? Probably not. As the funds from the delinquent unit owner come in, the association is made whole. In theory, that would be the time for you to pay for your driveway as originally agreed, less the money you already paid for the driveway. Your trustee is wrong in assuming that any money put in the Reserve Fund can be used at the Trustee’s discretion. However, to enforce your rights as a unit owner, you will have to sue. Again, it is a question of value. In a small association like yours there is rarely any tangible amount of money in the coiffeurs to make a lawsuit worthwhile. It is in everyone’s best interest that you get along. Play nice and ask for fairness. If you can’t get the trustee to play nice, consider selling. It would likely be easier in the long run than doling out good money on a lawsuit that may not yield any money to you at the end. It’s your choice. Good luck!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *