Tag Archives: Buying

Previous Condo Owner Installed Hardwood Floors Improperly

S.B. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

We are having problems with our hardwood floors cupping. We just found out that our Management told the previous owner that the floors were not being properly installed and this could happen. Isn’t it the responsibility of Management to let us know of this improper installation before we purchased the unit? Shouldn’t they help pay for some of the very expensive repairs we now have? Thanks for your help.

Mister Condo replies:

S.B., I am sorry that you find yourself in this position. In my opinion, this is your problem and not anyone else’s. I assume you had the home inspected before you made the purchase. I could argue that the previous owner had a responsibility to let you know about the potential problem as a disclosure to the sale of the property but other than being an “oversight” on their part, I doubt any real estate disclosure laws were broken. Typically, units are sold “as is”, meaning the unit is now your responsibility, defects and all. My understanding is that is it very difficult to cure cupping hardwood floors as moisture is typically the culprit. Unless you can remove the moisture, it is likely you will need to replace the floors. My recommendation would be to heed the advice of proper installation so you don’t have a repeated failure. Sorry I don’t have better news. All the best!

Previous Condo Owner May Have Failed to Disclose Upcoming Special Assessment


C.P. from Middlesex County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

My daughter bought a condo where her association fees are $450.00 per month. Due to future major roof improvement job her payment will increase by $300.00. We feel the seller had to know about this upcoming project and didn’t reveal this very crucial information. The other choice to pay would be a one-time payment for $22,000.00 per unit. There are 40 units. Something doesn’t seem legal here. Your thoughts.

Mister Condo replies:

C.P., I am sorry for your daughter’s predicament. It is quite possible that the previous owner was aware that there was a possibility of a Special Assessment but unless the Special Assessment had already been passed and levied against the unit owners of record, it is unlikely that they did anything illegal. In fact, the knowledge that this Special Assessment was looming may have been a very important factor in his/her decision to sell. You can and should speak to an attorney to make sure the seller had already been informed of the assessment and failed to provide that information. If they signed a disclosure statement where they lied about the Special Assessment, you may very well have a case. All the best!

How Can I Buy a Deceased Owner’s Condo?


J.S. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

How can I buy a deceased owner’s condo?

Mister Condo replies:

J.S., deceased owners have their property disposed of according to either their will or the probate system. You would buy this property pretty much the way you would buy any other property. The challenge may be in determining exactly who the owner of the property is. If there was a mortgage on the property, the bank holding the mortgage may be the eventual owner. If there was no mortgage and the property were left to a family member via will or probate, the new owner will eventually be known through property records and you could contact the new owner to express your interest in purchasing the unit. If there were any other lien holders on the property (the association, for instance if there were unpaid assessments or common fees) the unit could end up in their hands. Again, you would contact them and let them know of your interest in purchasing the property. It is quite possible that any of these entities will simply use a real estate agent to sell the property. If you see the “for sale” sign go up, you know what to do. Good luck!

Sample Condo Co-Ownership Agreement

S.E. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Hi I am looking for a sample co ownership agreement for two or more people owning a single condo unit.

Mister Condo replies:

S.E., co-ownership agreements are legal documents and they are not “one size fits all” as there are different laws in each state that would need to be taken into consideration before preparing such a document. Also, since I am not an attorney, I don’t offer any legal opinions or advice here. On a friendly note, I did a quick internet search of your query and found a great document at one of my favorite internet legal advice websites, nolo.com. Check out: https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/joint-property-concurrent-ownership-32229.html. This article deals with various types of co-ownership and co-tenancy agreements. It might head you in the right direction. The best advice I have for you is to work with a locally qualified attorney who can give you the best answer for your part of the country. Happy Co-Ownership!

Previous Condo Unit Owner Had No Right to Modify Attic

S.S. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I bought my condo in February of 2015. On the mezzanine floor, the previous owner had extended in to the attic a sort of storage room. Basically, there is a door and it leads in to the roof attic for extra storage. I now received a registered letter to close up this area as per it being part of the common ground and is not entitled to me. What’s more is that I was never told by the inspector, the agent, nor the previous owner that it did not belong to me. This extra storage room made my decision for actually purchasing this unit. What can I do? Can I ask the board committee to keep this extra room or am I to close it up? Can I sue the previous owner, agent or/and inspector for not disclosing this room to me?

Mister Condo replies:

S.S., I am sorry for your predicament. The foul was created by the previous owner who had no business commandeering common space and modifying the unit without Board approval. You can certainly petition the Board to allow the modification but I don’t see why they should do so. If they allow it for your unit, they open themselves up to allowing similar modifications throughout the complex. You should comply with their request to return the unit to the condition before the modification was made. As for lawsuits, etc., I am not an attorney and I offer no legal advice here. You should speak with a locally qualified attorney to see if you have a case against the previous unit owner. My guess is that you might have a case but I am not sure how you could prove any damages to yourself that would be worth pursuing. All the best!

Condo Owner Wants to Sell Condo Carport Space Without Deed

R.R. from Missouri writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I own a condo in St. Louis County, MO. The condo has 2 carport spaces that we thought were deeded to me however they are not actually on my deed. My neighbor wants to buy a space but I am not sure they are mine to sell. The association thought they were deeded to me as well. Any advice?

Mister Condo replies:

R.R., if you rock the boat hard enough, it just might tip over. Real estate deeds are very specific and legal documents. Right now, you don’t have a deed to your “deeded” carport spaces. How can you convey a deed to your neighbor that you don’t have? You can’t. My guess is that the spaces are actually owned by the association but are for your exclusive use, meaning they are a limited common element and you don’t own them and you can’t sell them. If your deed says otherwise, thane you can do as you see fit. However, from what you have told me, you can’t sell what you don’t own. A better solution might be a friendly handshake and understanding that your neighbor can use one of your spaces. And if he wants to offer you some money for that favor, who’s to say what is happening. All the best!

Florida Rental Condo Sold with Previous Owner Keeping Future Rental Deposits

S.C. from Florida writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

We recently bought a condo in Florida. The previous owner has booked rentals through to next year. Is he entitled to keep those deposits even though he does not currently own the condo?

Mister Condo replies:

S.C., it depends on how you negotiated the sale and purchase of the condo. Are you physically living there or is it a rental property for you as well? Are the future leases in your possession or the previous owner? I can’t imagine any situation where an attorney handling this transaction would have let such a potential problem go unanswered during the closing process. If you handled this transaction without the advice of an attorney, you will very likely need one now as the folks expecting the rental property to be available for them will most certainly expect that their deposits will be used towards payment of their rent for the property. My advice is to review the purchase and sale agreement and see what it says about these previous deposits. If it looks unfavorable to you, you should get in touch with a qualified attorney who can best advise you what your next steps should be. Good luck!

Should I Rent or Purchase a Second Condo Parking Space?

S.K. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

My husband and I want to buy a new condo. We would need 2 cars. The condo comes with one parking spot. The second parking spot is $23,000. Or, hopefully there will be a spot to rent, but that wouldn’t allow us to park next to each other. We don’t know if we will live there for 6 years or it could be as little as 1 or 2 years. This is the only time that we can decide to get adjacent parking spots. Is it worth the risk?

Mister Condo replies:

S.K., I am not sure I understand what the risk is. It sounds like you will be allowed to park both of your vehicles on the association’s lot as long as you secure a second spot. Purchasing the spot is a better idea, in my opinion as you should have no problem reselling it when you leave the community. Renting a second spot could prove a bit riskier because you do so at the desire of the parking space’s owner, who could sell it or decide to no longer rent it to you at some point. If it were me, I would purchase both the condo and the second parking space. My guess is you will have no problem selling both when the time comes to move out. All the best!

Turning a 2-Bedroom Condo into a 3-Bedroom Unit

M.M. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

We are considering buying a condo which has 2 bedrooms. We thought to set the kids in the bedrooms and transform the dining room into our “bedroom”. We were thinking to install some sliding doors to enclose the dining room – they could be just sliding on the ceiling, no need for railing on the floor. We just need some privacy as adults, but we are not fussy. Anything simple, practical would do. However, after reading online that permission needs to be asked for everything from HOA, we are a bit skeptical they would allow sliding doors. Then we thought about using IKEA tall bookcases, or even heavy curtains as dividers. What do you think would be our best bet? Does any idea above not need approval from HOA? Thank you!

Mister Condo replies:

M.M., by design, this 2-bedroom condo has two bedrooms. You are attempting to turn it into a three-bedroom unit. My first instinct is to tell you to simply look for three-bedroom unit so you don’t need to alter the unit in any way, regardless of the permission required by the HOA. HOA restrictions are in place for a few reasons. People purchase into an HOA with an expectation that the HOA rules will be observed by residents and enforced by the Board of Directors and/or their assigns such as the Management Company. If you can find a way to live comfortably in this unit without breaking any of the HOA covenants, then you should be good to go. However, consider the long-term ramification of giving up a dining room or needing to live behind a bookcase instead of a walled-off room as is typical for most adults. It seems to me that you simple need a larger unit. Maybe the cost is keeping you from seeking such a unit but I have to question the long-term happiness of you and your family living in a confined space without a dining area. One of the central goals of condo living is a comfortable life style. If you can achieve that without breaking any rules, more power to you. Only you can answer that question. Good luck!

Condo Resale Disclosure

P.E. from New Jersey writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

What are the disclosure laws in New Jersey for the resale of a condo?

Mister Condo replies:

P.E., I am not an attorney so I cannot give you a legal answer here. You should speak with a qualified attorney in your region to get a legal response to your question. However, I can offer some friendly advice. Michael Odenthal of the New Jersey Cooperator has an excellent piece I commend to your reading: https://njcooperator.com/article/rules-of-disclosure/For the most part, it is a “buyer beware” transaction. However, a buyer that withholds pertinent information is typically liable for withholding of that information. My friendly advice is that any buyer have an attorney represent their best interest and have a full home inspection performed BEFORE signing any purchase and sale agreement.