Tag Archives: Financial

When Do Monthly Condo Common Fees Begin?

G. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Good Day, Mister Condo! Do I need to pay monthly dues even if I sign the certificate of acceptance but have complained (fixture of toilet bowl is not working)? I don’t have a key yet but I have signed an agreement. What will I do?

Mister Condo replies:

G., I am sorry for your situation. Quite honestly, your best bet would have been to not sign any contract until the unit was in good working order and to your liking. Once you have signed the agreement to purchase the unit, you are on the hook for the common fees that accrue from that day forward. So, even if the toilet bowl isn’t working properly, you still have to pay your common fees. If you don’t, the association will be forced to take collection actions against you which can be quite costly. You don’t want that to happen. Pay your fees and work with the association to get your toilet fixed. Hopefully, you’ll be able to enjoy your new unit once that repair is made. All the best!

Who Sets the Condo’s Percentage of Rental Units?

J.H. from New Haven County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Supposedly, the percentage of renters in a Connecticut condo association has been changed to allow up to 50% of the units to be rented. If this is correct, where can I find a copy of the law, and who sponsored it? The more renters allowed will increase our insurance costs, change the demographics of the community and discourage most people from buying units in the complex.

Mister Condo replies:

J.H., I am not aware of any law in our state that allows up to 50% of units in any condo association to be rented. Rental restrictions or rental caps are usually outlined in the condominium’s governing documents, if at all. Many associations refer to FHA guidelines (set by the federal government, not the states) so they can maintain or obtain FHA qualification for mortgages to be obtained by unit owners. If associations allow more rentals than the FHA guidelines call for, it becomes unlikely that unit owners will be able to get mortgages within the association as the association as a whole becomes ineligible in the eyes of the FHA, and, therefore, those banks that offer FHA-backed mortgages. All that being said, you need to look at your governance documents to see what, if anything, they say about limiting the percentage of rental units. If the documents are silent on the subject (many are), you might like to see what restrictions may have been placed on the units over the years. Keep in mind that the entire body of unit owners needs to vote on such restrictions. I agree with your assessment of what happens when communities become dominated with rentals However, there are many community associations where investors have purchased a majority of units with the only intention is to rent them out and eventually sell the units at a profit. If you live in such an association, rental restrictions would be hard to implement. Good luck!

Condo Vendors Work for the Board; Not the Unit Owners!

L.K. from New Haven County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

A company was hired by the Board to do an assessment of the complex and provide a report to the board in order to get a loan. I called the person who did the report to ask some questions and he said he had been instructed not to answer questions from unit owners. All questions have to go to the Board first. No direct contact is allowed. Can the Board restrict unit owners from talking to a vendor hired by the Board and paid for by unit owners?

Mister Condo replies:

L.K., even though it might seem contrary to reason, the vendor was hired by the Board, not the unit owners. The vendor reports only to the Board. That doesn’t mean you don’t have a right to see the report once it becomes part of the association’s records but until then, the vendor, in this case it sounds like a Reserve Study expert, is correct not to interface with unit owners as it might color the report made to the Board. The Reserve Study specialist needs to be completely objective and present his or her findings directly to the Board. Your observation that unit owners have paid for this contractor is not technically correct. Yes, you and your fellow unit owners all pay your common fees but the governance of those funds is the exclusive purview of the Board. This is very similar to paying your taxes to the town or city in which you live. People that work for the town or city are not your employees, are they? No, the same is true for folks employed by the association. They work for the Board and are responsible only to the Board. I hope your Board makes good use of your new Reserve Study. Good luck!

Florida Condo President Facing Multiple Challenges

R.H. from Florida writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

My 24-unit condo by laws say that an audit must be conducted once a year. Florida statutes say every 3 years. In addition, the property manager pushed through a specific contractor and that was 3 times the price but the other directors back her up. I am the president but I can’t get any info from her because she is aggressive and doesn’t let me say a word without attacking me verbally. I am now taping the meetings. A woman is unofficially taking notes but doesn’t sign them. They are not a good synopsis. What do I do?

Mister Condo replies:

R.H., thank you for your service to your community. I am sorry it isn’t a better experience for you. Let’s try and break down a few of the symptoms and see if we can’t get you on the right path. The audit requirement in your governing documents likely override the state requirement as they call for more frequent auditing. If your bylaws called for audits every 5 years, then the state law would supersede your documents and you would need to audit every three years. The contractor performing the audit is hired by the Board. As long as the rest of the Board is OK with this auditor then there may not be too much you can do about it. Ideally, hiring an auditor is no different than any other vendor. Bids should be collected and a contractor selected. If your Board doesn’t function that way, there may not be too much you can do about this particular vendor. Unofficial notes are not the proper method of taking Minutes of meetings. Are there formal Minutes of your meetings? If not, the association is opening itself up to all kinds of troubles. Minutes are the official and legal records of your meetings. The Board Secretary has the responsibility of keeping these vital records. As President, you are functioning as the executive of the association and it is important that you know what needs to be done. If any vital functions are not being handled correctly, you may need to offer assistance or seek new volunteer leaders from within your community to get the job done. Typically, property managers work closely with their Boards to manage the association. The adversarial relationship you have described to me makes me wonder why the association would renew their agreement with the manager. I would encourage you to take a good look at the management company agreement and get competitive bids for when the renewal comes up. There is no reason for the association to continue using a manager that doesn’t work well with the Board. However, if the rest of the Board is satisfied you may find them reluctant to change management companies. I wish you all the best.

Condo Audit Requirement Law

A.B. from New Haven County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Are there any CT states law that require audits be performed on Condominiums?

Mister Condo replies:

A.B., in Connecticut, I am aware of no such law. Some states, like New Jersey, do require audits at certain intervals as a matter of law. It should be noted that all audits are not created equal so even if there were an audit requirement, it would have to be detailed as to what was being audited and how often. Depending on the amount of money in play, an audit is a prudent decision as it provides relative confidence that no association funds are being pilfered. However, since Connecticut is home to so many smaller associations, an audit might be an unnecessary expense and truly unnecessary. If the Board is doing a good job of keeping an eye on the money as to income and expense, an audit might be one more useful tool. If the Board suspects there is money that has gone missing, an audit would be a great way to get some clues as to where the money has gone. I hope that helps.

Delinquency Usually Leads to Collection Action by the Condo Association

R.A. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I was previously 3 months delinquent on my common charges with no assessments and the condo association attorneys told me that I had to pay a total of $2000 dollars in order not to go into foreclosure. It seems to me that I am being extorted for money and I am on disability. The reason the attorney said I had to pay the $2000 dollars was for title search, legal letters and other fees that I do not understand. My delinquent fees are only $690 and they are trying to tact $2000 on top of that fee. My HOA dues are $230 a month. I was also told by the management Company that I could not talk to the Board because the matter was out of their hands and I had to deal with them or their attorneys. Being an owner in a condo I know I have rights other than to do nothing. I have been paying my common charges with an extra $100 dollars to put toward the delinquent balance. I know I’m being taken advantage of, can you please help me? Thank you.

Mister Condo replies:

R.A., you most certainly do have rights as a condo owner but not paying your common fees is not one of them. I am sorry you find yourself in this position but what choice does the association have? For the three months that you were delinquent, all of the bills of the association were still paid. Your insurance, your grounds keeping, your maintenance, your unit management, all of this and more were still paid. By not paying your fees on time, you triggered a legal action against yourself. The association turned the matter over to the collections folks (the attorney) and they did what they do which is take steps to insure the association gets paid. In this case, that meant lots of legal fees. While I appreciate that you may face special challenges as a disabled person, I am sure you know there are certain expenses of owning a condo that are recurring monthly – mortgage, common fees, utilities. If you don’t pay your mortgage or utilities, what happens? The bank can take your home or the utilities will turn off your supply. It is the same with common fees. I am sure you will always pay them on time in the future so this may just be an expensive lesson in why. You should speak with the collection folks about your $100 per month repayment schedule to make sure it is acceptable. Ideally, you would just pay off what you owe and be done with it. If you feel your rights as a homeowner were violated, you should most definitely speak with an attorney. I am not a lawyer so I cannot offer you any legal advice on the matter. From what you have told me, you were treated the same as any other delinquent homeowner would be treated. Good luck!

Condo Executive Board Deferring Common Fees as Payment for Service!

B.D. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

 

Our Executive Board of 5 members has about 80% of their monthly HOA fees deferred as compensation for their time spent working on Association issues. Their contention is that 1099’s need not be issued because the Association is a nonprofit entity as defined by IRS regulations. I believe that is incorrect and that they each should have received a 1099, declared the income, and paid whatever taxes were due to the State and Federal Government. I researched the question and found some information from the National Council of Nonprofits that suggests 1099s should have been issued, but the particular circumstance they cite has to do with charitable nonprofits. I don’t think that makes a difference, but would like clarification before I approach them with the information. Thank you for your time and expertise.

 

Mister Condo replies:

B.D., since I am neither an attorney nor an expert on IRS regulations regarding non-profit organizations, I cannot offer you a legal opinion on this issue. However, I will say it is tremendously unusual for any individual to receive tax-free income from any source and would not likely stand up to the scrutiny of an audit by the IRS. Further, do your governing documents allow for compensation to Board Members? Most condominium association by-laws forbid compensation of any kind to Board Members as it is a voluntary service, meaning the volunteers seek election and then volunteer their time on the Board. If your Board has taken it upon itself to claim compensation for their volunteer efforts, the association may have a legal case to take action against them and have all monies paid to the Board Members returned to the association. Taking funds improperly from the association is theft and punishable with fines and/or jail. It is most definitely time to speak to a qualified attorney from your state to discuss how your Board has decided to conduct business. If laws have been broken, they need to be thrown off the Board and charged accordingly. At the very least, they should return any money they have received in compensation for their voluntary service. Good luck!

Condo Owner Seeks Access to Reserve Study

G.H. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Is the most recent Reserve Study that the BOD uses to determine owner’s monthly contribution to the HOA reserve fund one of the business documents that any owner has the right to review and/or have a copy of?

Mister Condo replies:

G.H., as a shareholder in the corporation, you have the right to review any and all official records of the association. The Reserve Study is prepared for the association at the Board’s request. Unlike Minutes of a meeting, it is not created by the association but, rather, for the Board to be used as a guide to make sure the proper level of Reserves is being collected to keep the association fiscally sound as the years go by and the common elements deteriorate. It can be argued that since it is a tool for the Board and not an actual record of the Board, it may not be freely available to association members. However, if you request a copy (at your expense), I would think most Boards would allow it. There may be a record inspection fee and there might also be a “per page” copy fee. Reserve studies can be lengthy so it could get a little pricy. Do you know what firm performed the study? You might be able to request an electronic copy of the document which would save you both time and money. If you are fully denied access to the document, you might want to speak with an attorney and see if there is any other way to compel the document from the association. I might also ask you why you need it. If you trust the sitting Board members to properly care for the association’s fiscal needs, the Reserve study is simply a tool to help them do so. Your annual budget, which you most certainly have a right to inspect, will show you what they are doing with that information. I would guess a healthy Reserve Fund contribution would be somewhere around 30% of common fees. If the Board is simply using a 10% number, then it is likely they are following FHA guidelines and not the Reserve Study. Kudos to you for paying attention. Most condo owners simply submit their common fees and hope for the best. Good luck!

Condo Developer Transition Turmoil

S.C. from Litchfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Our Board does nothing. No communication, they don’t respond to our questions very well, they are not transparent when they communicate among each other (which is not too often) and my biggest beef, they refuse to fix our crumbling infrastructure (roads, outside siding, fascia boards, etc.). It’s one delay, one excuse after another and this has been going on for almost 3 years. Money is tight, they do not properly fund our community yet they are raising the dues and still operating with a negative balance. No one on the board lives here full-time and the president and one other member work for the developer. Clearly, their priorities are not in sync with the homeowners. Most residents will not say a word for fear of being the bad one or simply a case of extreme apathy. I want to round up the troops and have all the board members (well, 3 out of 4) removed. Having been the president of the association and property manager, I have plenty of experience.  I do not know what kind of reaction I will get but I do know there will be some support. Any response from you would be great and I look forward to it. Thank you.

Mister Condo replies:

S.C., I am sorry that your condo Board is not performing to your expectations. However, from what you have told me, the association is still under developer control so the Board truly has limited power during this time period. Once control is handed over to the association, things will change because no one will be beholden to the developer. The association governs itself and many of the items you discuss can be addressed through democratic elections of interested and able volunteers. Now, if the developer has broken covenants with the owners and you think a lawsuit is in order, you might want to discuss your situation with an attorney. However, new owners like you describe may not go along with spending money to sue the developer so you may just need to wait until the developer transition period is complete. If I have misread your letter and the developer transition is already complete, you simply need to elect new leaders for your community. You will need volunteers ready, able, and willing to serve. They will need training and support. You should also consider hiring a community association attorney verse in developer transition, and accountant, and a property manager if needed. The developer’s team was there to support the developer, not the community association. Getting the right folks in place is vitally important to your association’s success. Your local CAI Chapter can help you find the resources you need. Visit http://caict.org to learn more. Good luck!

Condo Reserve Study Reveals Major Shortage

B.P. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Our new condo management company did a projection study. Unit owners received a letter stating that each unit will be assessed $50,000 payable over a 30-year period unless we vote to take over inside and outside of our units. Is this legal?

Mister Condo replies:

B.P., I’ve never heard of such a thing but that doesn’t make it illegal. The whole idea of a condominium association is that the association is responsible for all common elements, which includes the exterior of the buildings. Individual unit owners do not own the building exteriors so they are not directly responsible for the care and upkeep of them. I say “not directly” because unit owners do have to do two things to make sure their properties are well maintained. The first is to pay their common fees on time. Common fees are the lifeblood of the association and include a contribution to the Reserve Fund, which is where the money to maintain the common elements should eventually come from. Second, and equally important is that unit owners need to elect responsible folks to govern their association. The Board is directly responsible for overseeing the upkeep of the association. They typically do so by hiring outside contractors and management companies to implement this duty but they are the ones representing the association in all matters regarding maintenance and preservation of the association’s common elements. Your governance documents clearly spell out the duties of the association with regards to common elements. If I had to guess, I would say that the communication you received is not properly communicating the message of a Reserve Fund contribution. $50K contribution over 30 years is a little less than $140 per month. Without knowing the amount of assets your association needs to maintain, I would say that is not an unreasonable number for monthly Reserve Fund contributions. I would hope that your association is already collecting these Reserves as part of your monthly common fees. If not, this letter may have been meant to serve as a warning that there is going to be an increase to your common fees to cover the necessary Reserve Fund contribution needed to maintain the community. The “projection study” conducted by the management company may have actually been a “Reserve Study” and they are simply conveying the results of the study. Either way, your association needs to build a healthy Reserve Fund so future repairs can be afforded. Every single common element is aging as we speak. Money needs to be collected today for those replacement projects tomorrow. All the best!