Tag Archives: Insurance

Condo Roofers Damage Unit Owner’s Air Conditioner

R.G. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

In doing work on the roof of my mom’s large condominium, they needed to move the air conditioners and my 86-year-old mother is the only resident out of maybe 50 units whose A/C was damaged. The contractors admit that they dropped materials in it and said they had fixed it earlier in the week but today, Saturday, it won’t cool. It is set at 75 and remains at 80. Who is responsible and how can I best advocate for my mom? The management company calls the contractor and the contractor claims that it isn’t his fault, it’s the unit’s. The unit is over 10 years old… BUT IT WORKED BEFORE THEY MOVED IT AND DROPPED STUFF IN IT! I appreciate your help.

Mister Condo replies:

R.G., I am sorry that your mother’s air conditioner was damaged. Most states require that a damaged product like an air conditioner be replaced at the market value at the time the damage occurred. My guess is that a 10-year-old air conditioner isn’t worth too much, regardless of how well it worked before it was damaged. Clearly, the blame lies with the roofing contractors who moved and damaged the unit. However, the real question here is liability and cost of replacement. You can continue to complain to anyone who will listen but unless you can prove the value of the air conditioner to be significant. I am afraid your best bet will be to simply purchase a new air conditioner. I am sorry I don’t have better news for you. Good luck!

Failed Condo Water Heater Creates Question of Responsibility

M.A. from New Haven writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

My hot water heater leaked into the condo below me. I had the heater replaced. Am I responsible for the damage caused to the ceiling of the downstairs condo unit?

Mister Condo replies:

M.A., I am sorry for you and your downstairs neighbor’s damage and problems. Whether or not you are responsible depends on a few things. If your association provides and enforce maintenance standards for common wear items like water heaters and you didn’t violate those standards, then the association may have insurance to help cover the cost of your neighbor’s damage. Your neighbor should have his or her own homeowner’s insurance policy which should cover some of the damage, less a deductible, that could be passed on to you or the association. Your own homeowner’s insurance may offer you some coverage against these costs as well. If you didn’t follow any published maintenance standard for replacing your water heater (typically every seven years or so) then you may be on the hook for the damage. I am not sure what you have been asked to pay but make sure all of the players involved have checked with their own insurers before you start parting with any cash. If it turns out you are being asked to pay money that you do not agree with, you may wish to speak to an attorney who can tell you what your legal responsibilities are. Good luck!

Why Should Condos Implement Maintenance Standards?

R.P. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Why should Condo’s implement Maintenance Standards?

Mister Condo replies:

R.P., there are a myriad of reasons that condo associations should implement Maintenance Standards. First and foremost is to limit the association’s liabilities. Things that routinely wear down and break like water supply lines can cause a great deal of damage which is easily minimized or prevented with Maintenance Standards. Secondarily, many insurers require these standards to be in place or the insurer will not cover the resultant damage. That could lead to huge out of pocket expenses for both associations and unit owners. Finally, many Maintenance Standards provide greater safety and peace of mind for all unit owners and residents. Who doesn’t want that?

Neighbor Damages Unit, Refuses to Pay for Repairs

L.W. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

A few months ago, a neighbor (a tenant – owner rents it out) attempted to make a change to the plumbing in his kitchen. It was done incorrectly, causing water to flow incessantly for several days into my garage which is below their kitchen. Water flowed all across the length of my ceiling (into the area where the air conditioning ducts are housed), and down the sides of the walls causing the sheet rock and insulation to be very soaked with water. I hired a painting and home improvement company who has done work for me and several others in this complex to get rid of all the water-soaked materials, and then to replace the materials once the area had time to dry out. It took them a several hours for several days to complete the work. It was done nicely, and I am satisfied with the work.

The problem is that the owner of the unit believes my contractor’s final price was too high – $750. I believe it was a fair and reasonable price. He is someone I trust, and he does good work. The owner paid half of that bill. I believe he should be the rest. He (by allowing his tenant to perform unlicensed plumbing work) endangered not only my unit, but those nearby. If I had not been home and noticed the leaking in my garage (the tenants were away for the week), the damage may have been disastrous.

Do you have any ideas on how to get this unit owner to pay the rest of the bill? I am considering Small Claims Court if he doesn’t pay within the next few weeks.

Mister Condo replies:

L.W., I am sorry for your problems. Typically, when a unit owner damages another owner’s unit, their insurance or even the association’s insurance is used to handle the repair of the damaged area. Since you took it upon yourself to handle the damage repair, you may be on the hook to collect from the other unit owner (or their insurance). Personally, I like your “take charge” common sense approach to getting the repair handled in timely fashion. However, now you may need to take your neighbor to Small Claims court to get your money back. Honestly, it sounds to me like you got an exceptional price for the work but your “shoot first, ask questions later” approach is receiving pushback from your neighbor. You might want to run the information past an attorney to see if you have a legal leg to stand on. Also, since the neighbor has already drawn a line in the sand at $375, you may need to ask yourself how much aggravation you are willing to suffer to recover the extra $375. You might just want to write this one off and pay attention to what happens the next time and hope that there isn’t a next time. All the best!

Falling Tree Damages Condo Visitor’s Car

C.B. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I was visiting a friend in the Condo and a tree (huge part of it) fell on my car, cause many damages. Can I have the right to sue the Condo for pay the deductible of my insurance? The general manager didn’t go there to see the damage and, on the phone, he just said that the homeowner’s association does not have insurance so he’s not going to pay for it. The deductible is $500 and my car is 2016.

Mister Condo replies:

C.B., I am sorry that your car got damaged. The right to sue another individual or business is yours if you choose to pursue it. However, the cost of suing this condo association for the $500 deductible on your insurance policy will most likely outweigh the potential of collecting the $500 from the association. This is part of the risk of having deductibles on our insurance. Clearly, this was not your fault but your insurance policy is only going to pay for the amount of damage that exceeds your deductible. The rest is on you. You can speak with an attorney if you would want to see if there is any other avenue open to you but my advice would be to simply pay your deductible. Otherwise, you are likely throwing good money after bad. All the best!

Condo Insurance Won’t Cover Plumber’s Damage to Unit

M.C. from Hartford County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Our plumber installed a dishwasher improperly and water leaked under the floor, destroying the laminate and ceiling tiles in lower room. Asbestos was found in vinyl under laminate and must be removed. The plumber is taking responsibility. Our insurer insists that this damage, restricted to inside our walls, and not caused by condo-owned components (such as a roof leak would be) is the condo association responsibility by law and we can’t go to plumber’s insurance (nor to our own). Our condo association denies this and has refused to file a claim. The only law I can find does not seem to say this, but only seems to make a condo association responsible for horizontal surfaces between stacked units. This is a 2010 law. Can condo insurance be held responsible for my dishwasher leak?

Mister Condo replies:

M.C., I am sorry you find yourself in this situation. When insurers deny claims it is the homeowner who gets hurt. Asbestos abatement only adds to the problem. I can see where the association is denying your request as the damage is restricted to the interior of your unit. Until the plumber damaged the flooring, there was no liability. I am not quite sure why the plumber’s insurance would deny a claim of damage caused by his workmanship (isn’t that what his insurance is for?) but it still puts the cost of making the repair on you. Depending on how much the repair will cost, I would advise you one of two ways. If it is expensive (say more than $500), it may be worth speaking with an attorney to see if you can sue the plumber or the association. If the dollar amount is less than that (or if you were thinking of replacing the laminate floor) I would advise you to simply pay for the repair/upgrade and be done with it. I think it stinks that the insurance isn’t paying for this damage but unless the dollar amount is significant, I don’t think it is worth the time to try to sue for damages. All the best!

Who Pays for Storm-Damaged Gutters Installed by HOA Home’s Previous Owner?

J.D. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Gutters were installed by previous owner and we’re damaged by a common area tree from a storm. Who is responsible for replacement and costs?

Mister Condo replies:

J.D., since the gutters were installed by a previous owner it is likely the current owner (you) who is responsible. However, it is certainly worth a call or letter to the Board to report the damage and inquire of the HOA’s insurance will cover the damage, especially if it is particularly expensive. If there is a deductible or the repair doesn’t meet the insurance threshold, you will likely be told it is your expense. Finally, check your by-laws. If there is wording that indicates such damage is association responsibility, you may wish to highlight the language and send it along to the Board along with your request for the repair to be paid for by them. If they refuse and you strongly feel you are right, you might wish to speak to an attorney to get a clarification on the rules. If the Board has refused to pay and the dollar amount is not significant enough to seek further remedy, I would suggest you simply make the reapir yourself and continue to enjoy your gutters. Good luck!

Disaster Floods Condo; Association Refuses to Remediate Resultant Mold

C.D. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

My niece owns an upstairs condo unit.  Recently, the bottom unit was flooded by rain to the point of 6′ high.  The area has been declared a national disaster area and FEMA is processing claims.  My niece’s unit has mold growing up her walls and her floor is buckling due to the flood.  The owner of the downstairs unit started working to rid his unit of mold, mildew, etc. but stopped for some unknown reason.  FEMA has told my niece that her unit is a health hazard and needs to be vacated immediately. Here’s the kicker:  They tell her they cannot help her as had the downstairs owner took care of his condo, her condo wouldn’t have felt any effects of the flood.  What say you?

Mister Condo replies:

C.D., I am truly sorry your niece’s condo unit was flooded and damaged. Unfortunately, it would appear we live in a time of escalating natural disasters and many condos around the country have been impacted this past year. How a community association or HOA responds to these disasters can be just as damaging as the disasters themselves. Clearly, your niece has suffered a catastrophic loss here and it sounds like the HOA isn’t doing right by her. This could be because they aren’t familiar with how they should handle this disaster or they may not know where to turn to get the money to make the repairs or there may just be confusion caused by insurance companies or poorly written condo docs. It may be that the downstairs neighbor is also to blame and may be sued as well as part of the money recovery efforts. Whatever the reason, my next call would be to my attorney as this doesn’t look like it will be settled by simply asking the association to make the repairs. Also, if your niece has adequate homeowners’ insurance, she might be eligible for housing costs while the repairs are made. Clearly, she should not reside in a mold-infested unit. This is going to take a while to sort out but I am sure she will get the problem addressed once legal action is taken. Good luck!

Condo Board D&O Dos and Don’ts

C.V. from Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Can board members be sued along with the management company? Should board members carry extra insurance other than the standard policy already in force by association? Thank You!

Mister Condo replies:

C.V., that is a great question! I am not an attorney, so please accept my reply as friendly advice. You may wish to pose the same question to your association attorney for a proper legal answer. In today’s litigious society it is quite possible for Board Members as well as the Property Management company and even the Association as a whole to be sued. The association typically holds insurance policies that cover them for a wide range of possible lawsuits. Directors and Officers (D&O) is one of those policies and it covers Board Members for most typical lawsuits they might face in the performance of their duties. For most Board Members, that is enough coverage for peace of mind while serving as a volunteer member of Board of Directors. However, there have been cases where Board Members have made exceptionally poor decisions that can lead to criminal and/or personal lawsuits that are outside the scope of this coverage.  I am not sure if any additional insurance coverage would have helped them but it may be worth a conversation with your personal agent, especially if you are quite well off and concerned that a personal lawsuit would be a burden worth insuring against. I have personally served on Boards for most of my adult condo life and I have never sought additional coverage. Then again, I have never been sued performing my duties as a Board Member and I can’t imagine any of my actions as a Board Member not being covered by the association’s D & O policy. That being said, I wouldn’t consider serving on a Board where the D & O policy wasn’t in place and kept current. All the best!

Insurance Runaround Leaves Condo Renter with Uncovered Losses

P.P. from New Haven County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I was a tenant in a condo that was damaged by water that entered the unit causing complete damage to 800 square feet of the hardwood flooring, Sheetrock and our personal property/furniture. Since owners’ insurance approved full compensation for damage, cause described as ice dam. Our tenants’ insurance declined claim because of owners’ insurance ‘ice dam’. Upon demo of floors and walls it was discovered that the damage was long term and was the result of gross negligence. It was discovered that incorrect installation of replacement windows which cause a gap under the windows causing water to enter the full length of the wall. Our furniture against that wall was no only water damaged, but infested with mold. A total loss. The condo association also received insurance money to pay the owners deductible and repair the gap and siding. Our tenant’s insurance refuses to revise the original decline. Neither the owner, who had the Windows replaced without a permit from the condo, nor the condo association is taking responsibility for the cost of our damage. We continued to pay rent during the three-months-time to repair, without access to the main level of the house. We’ve contacted the state of CT INSURANCE DEPARTMENT and representative simply sends us the original ice dam determination from Liberty Mutual. We are in contact with the association’s insurance who points to owner’s liability so points back at negligence of association. We have lost 50% of our furniture and damage to the rest. Where can we go from here?

Mister Condo replies:

P.P., I am sorry for all of your problems. As a tenant, your renter’s insurance should be your primary method of recovery for loss such as this. Unfortunately, your insurer is looking to shift the burden and has pointed a finger at the association, delaying your claim and leaving you stuck in the middle. For starters, I would not renew my lease when it is up. You have identified enough underlying problems that you would be wise to seek a new rental. Your claim of loss is most likely going to be against your Landlord and his claim will be against the association. However, before you get into the expense and ongoing legal battle with insurers, your landlord, and the condo association, you need solid legal advice from a local attorney who can tell you what to expect. I would think your insurer is going to be your best bet for getting money back. You paid them a premium and they offered you the coverage. You put in a claim with them and they denied the claim. They are the most direct path to recovering your money. Then, they can take on the expense of suing the association’s insurance company for damage caused by negligence, and so on. If you try to tackle all of these issues on your own, you could end up spending thousands of dollars with little to show for it at the end of the day. At least with your own insurer, you can demonstrate the coverage you had in place at the time of the loss. They have their own attorneys who may be willing to settle with you to avoid a lawsuit. Speak to an attorney today to get a legal opinion on your best course of action. Good luck!