Tag Archives: Parking

Can I Use My Condo Parking Space As I See Fit?

M.S. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Hi I have a deeded parking spot that has its own tax bill. My son moved back home and has equipment to start a business in my parking spot. I park on the street. Someone complained as usual here and now they sent out an email that says the condo association 3-4 people decided nothing can be stored in a parking spot. Remove in a month or pay a fine. Isn’t this the same as my unit and I can keep items there?

Mister Condo replies:

M.S., the short answer is “no”, your parking space is not the same as your unit with regards to you using it as you see fit. The Board took the actions necessary to prevent other unit owners from following your example and using the parking lot for anything other than what it was intended for, namely, the parking of cars. Imagine living in a community where unit owners decided to store trash in their parking space or house livestock, etc.. It would quickly become chaotic, unsightly, and even dangerous. Your Board is in the right here, you should comply with the new rule. All the best to you and your son’s new business!

Condo Handicapped Parking Requirement

B.F. from New Haven County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

How many handicap parking spots are required for residential only condos?

Mister Condo replies:

B.F., since parking areas at residential condos are typically private property, owned by the association, there are no mandatory requirements for handicapped parking. The association, governed by its democratically elected Board of Directors, is in control of the common grounds, including the parking area. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) governs how many handicapped accessible parking spaces are in public parking lots but doesn’t address private parking lots. Any unit owner or resident is free to petition the Board to ask for handicapped parking but they are not under any obligation to provide them. The reality is that parking is at a premium at most condos and just isn’t feasible to allocate spaces within the limited resources of the association. Good luck!

Unit Owner’s Car Finish Damaged by Association-Owned Tree

A.T. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I have two assigned parking spaces. There is a lot of debris coming out of the tree above which destroys car paint. Am I entitled to request reassignment of parking or request tree removal from the HOA?

Mister Condo replies:

A.T., it is doubtful that you will get it but you can certainly request that the Board reassign your space or remove the tree. The Board controls the parking lot assignment and you more or less get what you get. I am sorry that there is a particularly nasty tree above your space but the Board is not obligated to do anything about that. Are you the only one effected? If not, gather a group of signatures to present top the Board. Perhaps there will be strength in numbers. Other than that, a car cover may be your best bet for protection. Good luck!

Condo’s No Parking Rules Ignored by Unit Owners Including Board President

K.J. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

There is a spot near my garage which is marked “No Parking”. If someone parks there, it is very difficult if not impossible to maneuver my car into my garage. Additionally, it narrows the driveway in our parking lot so that other cars have trouble going around the lot. Sometimes a neighbor will have a guest park there because the guest is too lazy to park in visitor parking which is about fifty feet away. One of my neighbors parks there weekly because it’s just more convenient than her garage. That neighbor is president of the condo complex. I have complained to her about “people” parking in that spot and she says “You’re right they shouldn’t” and then the same day SHE parks there. What should I do?

Mister Condo replies:

K.J., all you can do is complain loudly and often each and every time the “No Parking” rule is violated. The president of the Board is not exempt from the rules of the association and should be reported for each and every time she violates the rule as well. Presidents who feel they do not need to follow the rules of the association have no business serving as officers of the association and I would not hesitate to point that out at the next election cycle when she is running for reelection. If she isn’t going to follow the rules how can she be expected to enforce the rules, a primary duty of the Board? Other than that, it sounds like you have a series of unit owners and guest who just don’t care about the parking rules and how their violation of those rules inconveniences other community members. The world is full of rude and ignorant people; sounds to me like a fair number of them reside in your association. The rules are on your side; well-mannered residents are not. Keep complaining. It may get better; it may not. All the best!

Condo Board Enforces Parking Rules After 20 Years!

J.M. from Florida writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I have been living in my community for the last 20 years. Never have I had a problem with parking before. All of our units are single building divided into three town homes with a three-car, three-door, non-divided open garage. My garage section isn’t very big especially being completely open on the inside, it would be impossible to have three vehicles parked inside with the ability to get in and back out. I have things stored in my garage as any normal town home living person does leaving me unable to put a vehicle in the garage. There has been a new resident that moved onto our street in our gated community. Since his arrival he has joined the board for parking reasons and is causing nothing but problems this past year. I live in a two-bedroom unit with my wife and son. We have always parked one vehicle behind the other putting two in our driveway. The Board is trying to tell me that I can’t park two vehicles together anymore, one behind the other or they’re going to tow it. They even went as far as to paint yellow lines for parking limitations only for my building and the adjacent neighbors building. The rest of the entire community has no painted lines. There is a very big parking lot one street over from us that is guest parking for the pool and the clubhouse. They are telling us that we cannot park in guest parking. There is no other overflow owner vehicle parking anywhere else in the community. Even if I clear my garage that only takes care of two vehicles. Having three vehicles they’re trying to tell me there is no place I can park it that is acceptable. It has gotten to the point that me and my family are being severely harassed over this matter. Since I have been here for over 20 years does any kind of grandfathered rules apply? Don’t they have to provide some kind of overflow parking for residents since all the guest parking spots they say are not usable for resident vehicle? I am close friends with my neighbors in our building that are only here 4 months out of the year and they allow us to use their two spaces when they’re not here. They’re coming back very soon and before this turns into a huge legal matter, I want to know what my options are and how to fight back. Thank you so much for any kind of response or information you can provide me with. We are located in St. Petersburg, Florida (the Sunshine State).

Mister Condo replies:

J.M., I feel your pain but I don’t think you’re going to like my reply. Generally speaking, the association owns the parking areas in most condominium associations. That means that they make and enforce the rules dealing with parking. I am painfully aware of the notoriously small parking spaces you speak of. Maybe two cars and a golf cart would fit but three full-sized cars are not likely to fit. That being said, that isn’t the Board’s problem or concern. notoriously small parking spaces you speak of. Maybe two cars and a golf cart would fit but three full-sized cars are not likely to fit. That being said, that isn’t the Board’s problem or concern. You have what you have, no more, no less. The association is under no obligation to provide you with any additional parking and your deed likely doesn’t guarantee it either. Additionally, many associations prohibit the type of open storage of belongings you describe. In other words, carports and garages are for parking only. I wouldn’t be surprised if the Board enacts and enforces a rule prohibiting storage in the garages so be ready. The bottom line is that the Board has many powers given to them by the association’s governance documents and state law. If you feel they have overstepped and can back it with provisions of your governing documents, you should seek legal counsel to see if you can fight back. Other than that, your 20-years of using the parking garage as you saw fit rather than how the by-laws read was a bonus for you. I am not aware of any provision that grandfathers in breaking of the rules because it suits you. You can always seek out a seat on the Board yourself as your neighbor has done and see if you can make the changes you seek from within the Board but understand that service on the Board involves much more than just your personal parking issues. I wish you all the best!

Condo Owner Wants to Sell Condo Carport Space Without Deed

R.R. from Missouri writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I own a condo in St. Louis County, MO. The condo has 2 carport spaces that we thought were deeded to me however they are not actually on my deed. My neighbor wants to buy a space but I am not sure they are mine to sell. The association thought they were deeded to me as well. Any advice?

Mister Condo replies:

R.R., if you rock the boat hard enough, it just might tip over. Real estate deeds are very specific and legal documents. Right now, you don’t have a deed to your “deeded” carport spaces. How can you convey a deed to your neighbor that you don’t have? You can’t. My guess is that the spaces are actually owned by the association but are for your exclusive use, meaning they are a limited common element and you don’t own them and you can’t sell them. If your deed says otherwise, thane you can do as you see fit. However, from what you have told me, you can’t sell what you don’t own. A better solution might be a friendly handshake and understanding that your neighbor can use one of your spaces. And if he wants to offer you some money for that favor, who’s to say what is happening. All the best!

Feeling Singled Out For Condo Parking Violation

S.B. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I received a letter from the management company that told me that I had to park my car centered back to front and side to side and I was not on the line or over the line or the next time I would get fined and I have taken pictures of other parking violations to show the management company. I feel that I was singled out and others park on the line and I was told that unless the trustees tell the management company to send these people a letter there is nothing that can be done. Is this true or should I talk to a condo lawyer? How is it I get a threating letter and others don’t?

Mister Condo replies:

S.B., you may have been singled out or you may have just been the only one who was reported as making a violation. Parking lots are always hot topics at condominiums and HOAs because there is often a shortage of spaces for the number of vehicles parked by residents and guests. How will you prove that you were singled out? Is there a pattern of discrimination or harassment? If you feel you have a legal complaint against your Board, you can pursue a legal solution. Have you spoken with a local attorney? That is who will give you the legal opinion about whether or not you have a case. My friendly advice is that you park as required by your condo’s rules and regulations. Report and document any parking violations you witness and send your complaints to the Board or Management Company. If they take action only against you, you may have a case. Otherwise, it may just be a simple one-time warning that you needn’t worry about too much. Good luck!

Condo Renters Threaten Lawsuit Over New Parking Arrangements

S.G. from New York writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I’m a board member of a 150-unit condo association. The property was built with only 120 parking spaces back then. We just reconstructed additional spaces on the property for the first time in over 50 years. We have unassigned spaces due to near 50/50 owner/renter ratio but have now given Priority parking for Resident Owners only and have designated spaces for renters on the other side of the property – a short walk. Prior to restructuring, renters parked closer to their units which also meant owners having no space at all. Our new lot however, now has about 10-12 unused preferred spaces every day where before restructuring, we never had a single open space.

A few renters have threatened to file a discrimination lawsuit based on 2 things: 1) they used to be able to park closer to the building and have now been assigned to the other side of the property/walking a longer distance, and 2) these 10-12 Preferred spaces which are sitting open every day magnifies the question: why can’t the Board make some of these spaces for renters?

We realize it’s the summer season with many vehicles off property/out of town and believe we may see a smaller number of empty spaces after Labor Day, but we really want to know if this would be a case of discrimination in NY or if a court would simply throw it out as the renters do have spaces, they just don’t like where they are now versus prior to the restructure.

Mister Condo replies:

S.G., unless the governing documents read otherwise, the association is free to do what they please with the association-owned parking lot. That being said, in a litigious society such as ours, you might want to run the scenario by the association attorney to see if any residents would have a case. In my opinion, they don’t but I am neither an attorney nor an expert in New York condo law. You will always have malcontents when you rearrange parking. There will be winners and losers but that doesn’t mean they have grounds for a lawsuit. Run it by your association attorney. My guess is you’re fine. All the best!

Can Condo Owner Park in Guest Parking Space?

R.C. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Each building has 36 tenants. Each owner has their own parking space. We also have guest spots. One owner has a spot they don’t like and parked in a guest spot nearer to them. Is there a rule against that? Thanks

Mister Condo replies:

R.C., you tell me! Is there a rule against that? A simple examination of your condo’s governing documents will tell you who can use the guest parking spaces. Typically, the spaces are reserved for guests but many condo documents say nothing about who can or can’t park there. In other words, if there are no rules about how the community association-owned parking lots are used, there may be no issue with your neighbor parking there. On the other hand, if there are rules or the Board decides to create rules about how the spaces are used, it is possible that neither he nor any other resident will be allowed use of these spaces. It seems to me that they were intended to be used as guest parking spaces and that is likely their best use. Good luck!

Condo Board Creates Questionable Parking Regulations

R.D. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Does the Board of Directors have the authority to override terms and conditions established in our governing documents with a plan conceived and designed at a board meeting that does not have majority approval from the community residents? They want to impose a parking plan and tow cars w/o stickers, yet the community document section has a section that addresses unit owner rights to an assigned spot and a section that defines the responsibility of that section. Defined responsibility does not include the mandatory uses of a sticker.

Mister Condo replies:

R.D., I understand your concern about the Board making plans to manage the parking areas. And you are right to be concerned about the lack of majority approval from unit owners before making such plans. However, the Board members were democratically elected by the unit owners to act on behalf of the association. Does your association have a problem with parking? Most associations manage their parking carefully as it is typically a precious resource. That doesn’t mean that the Board can simply pass rules without following the rules for making rules. As long as they have adopted the rules in accordance with their powers as outlined in the association’s governance documents, they are well within their rights to do so. Keep in mind that the community association parking areas is one of the biggest challenges faced by Boards. Unit owners, renters, and guests can make a real mess of limited parking. These new rules may be the association’s best chance at managing the chaos and keeping the parking lots under control. Like all new rules, there will be an adjustment period. Hopefully, no vehicles will actually have to be towed for order to be restored and all residents to have use of the association parking. Good luck!