Tag Archives: Rules Enforcement

Feeling Singled Out For Condo Parking Violation

S.B. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I received a letter from the management company that told me that I had to park my car centered back to front and side to side and I was not on the line or over the line or the next time I would get fined and I have taken pictures of other parking violations to show the management company. I feel that I was singled out and others park on the line and I was told that unless the trustees tell the management company to send these people a letter there is nothing that can be done. Is this true or should I talk to a condo lawyer? How is it I get a threating letter and others don’t?

Mister Condo replies:

S.B., you may have been singled out or you may have just been the only one who was reported as making a violation. Parking lots are always hot topics at condominiums and HOAs because there is often a shortage of spaces for the number of vehicles parked by residents and guests. How will you prove that you were singled out? Is there a pattern of discrimination or harassment? If you feel you have a legal complaint against your Board, you can pursue a legal solution. Have you spoken with a local attorney? That is who will give you the legal opinion about whether or not you have a case. My friendly advice is that you park as required by your condo’s rules and regulations. Report and document any parking violations you witness and send your complaints to the Board or Management Company. If they take action only against you, you may have a case. Otherwise, it may just be a simple one-time warning that you needn’t worry about too much. Good luck!

Making Condo Unit Owners Comply with Architectural Compliance

M.D. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I’m on the Board of a 118-unit high rise condo building and wondering if you’re aware of any effective strategies to enforce compliance with our “white only” exterior appearance of window treatments?

Mister Condo replies:

M.D., if the association has published and properly adopted architectural compliance guidelines that indicate “white only” exterior appearance of window treatments, it is as simple as citing the unit owners who have violated the guidelines. Typically, the Board would send a letter notifying the unit owner of the violation. If the unit owner complies in short order, no problem. If not, follow your documents as they pertain to rules violations. Typically, the unit owner is summoned to appear before the Board and offer defense/explanation. In this case, there isn’t too much to say. The window treatment is either white or it isn’t. The Board can then decide to fine the unit owner or not and use whatever methods it has at its dispose for correcting rules violations. My guess is the unit owners that are out of compliance have done so without knowing they were breaking the rules. A simple notice will likely suffice. If not, you have other options. Work with the unit owners to get them back in compliance. Time will heal all. Good luck!

Condo Board Members Attribute Storm Damage to Unit Owner’s Son

S.J. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Today I received an email from our property manager company stating that I was going to be assessed fees for repairs to the siding on our building. Attached was a picture of my 19-year-old son standing outside with a lacrosse stick. The claim was that my son had damaged the siding. My son did not damage the siding and the claim is completely unwarranted.

Two years ago, we had storm damage to many of our units and the old property management sent out notices to co-owners that repairs were being made. At this time, our board decided to change management companies and the repairs to our unit were never made.

I was able to obtain the original incomplete work order from the old company as proof that my son did not damage the siding. My concern is will they be able to charge me for this and what is the best way to handle the inappropriateness of a board member taking pictures and claiming something that is not true.

Mister Condo replies:

S.J., I am sorry you find yourself having to do battle with your Board. Any unit owner, including a Board member, is allowed to make a claim of damage against another unit owner. They can even take photos when warranted. The Board is then charged with informing the unit owner (you) and offering you a chance to address the Board to present your defense, denial, or acceptance of the claim against you. Clearly, you are denying the claim and you have your own evidence to support your denial. After you make your counterclaim, the Board is free to do as it sees fit within the bounds of your governing documents. Can they deny your rebuttal and claim your son caused the damage? Yes. Can you then sue them for their actions? Yes, again. Let’s hope it doesn’t come to that and that cooler heads prevail. It seems only logical that since your building’s storm damage was never repaired that these repairs need to be made. The claim against your son is scurrilous at best but may be taken seriously be the Board. You may wish to speak to an attorney if they proceed to charge the repairs to you and you will likely prevail from what you have shared with me here. If there is a pattern of harassment from this one particular Board member that took the photo, you might just want to sue them as well. That should get their attention so they can focus on the more important job of repairing the storm damage to the building and not look to saddle individual homeowners with their responsibility. All the best!

Condo Revokes Renters Pet Ownership Privileges

K.L. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I rented a unit in a condo building with a lease that allows me to have a dog (under a certain weight limit). I waited months to adopt a dog and a week before the dog arrived the condo association posted a notice in the Common Area announcing that only OWNERS were allowed to have pets. I promptly talked to my landlord about this and he said he would talk to the Condo Association. Fast forward several weeks and I now have the dog. The landlord informed me days ago that the “condo association” won’t allow him to bring the matter to the Board. I’m frustrated and confused and ready to break my lease. What recourse do I have?

Mister Condo replies:

K.L., I am sorry you find yourself in this unfortunate situation. The association has the right to regulate who can and cannot have pets on the property. Of course, they need to follow the rules for passing the rules but let’s assume that they did everything right and the rule now stands. Your beef is with your landlord who contractually allowed you to have a pet as a provision of the lease. He can no longer fulfill that provision of the lease which may give you a valid reason for you to break your lease, provided that is what you want to do. Hopefully, your landlord will not challenge your breaking of the lease based on this provision but you may need to speak to an attorney to protect yourself from a suit from your landlord for breaking the lease. Your landlord may be in a position to sue the association or ask for a grandfathering of the pet clause but this will cost him more time and trouble than simply replacing you with another tenant. It is an unfortunate situation to say the least. I wish you and your landlord a happy parting of the ways and a fast turnaround in you finding a new apartment and him finding a new tenant. Good luck!

Florida Condo Owner Needs to be Home When Family Stays Overnight

G. from Florida writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Hi! After 13 years at my condo I was told that my family members could not stay at my condo for a few days unless I was there. Is this legal? I had people stay there several times throughout the years for a few days and was never told I couldn’t do it. Your answer would be appreciated. Thank you.

Mister Condo replies:

G., your answer lies in your association’s governing documents. My gut instinct is that you will likely find that you are required to be in attendance with any guests, especially if they are using any amenities, such as a pool, tennis courts, clubhouse, etc.. Many associations have added such rules in recent years to prevent unit owners from subletting using services like AirBnB or VRBO, where they are actually making income from their units when they are not home. Check your documents. If there are provisions prohibiting you from having people stay in your unit when you are not at home, be thankful you weren’t fined for past violations and follow the rules moving forward. Good luck!

Condo Documents Dictate Double Late Fees and Fines

I.G. from Middlesex County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Our By-Laws stipulate a late fee of interest plus prime rate if a payment is 30 days past due. The Rules and Regulations stipulate a $100 fee after 15 Days. Which prevails? One or both?

Mister Condo replies:

I.G., hopefully, every unit owner pays on time and you don’t have to implement late fees. It is not uncommon for governing documents to have conflicting terms. It is up to the Board to correct the documents and implement a proper late fee policy. Since one dictates a fee after 15 days and the other dictates a fee after 30 days, you could make the argument for both being applicable. However, it would make more sense to have just one fee and a detailed collection strategy for what happens at 30 days and what happens at 60 days, with 60 days being the time the matter is turned over to the association’s collection agent or attorney. I hope you never need to do that. Good luck!

Who Can Enforce the Condo Rules?

S.P. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Who can enforce the rules?

Mister Condo replies:

S.P., I appreciate a question of simple words. Let me give you a simple answer. The Board of Directors is the democratically elected group of unit owners who can enforce the rules. Unit owners, such as you, can submit violations of rules by other unit owners but it is up to the Board to enforce (or not enforce if they so choose) the rules. If the Board doesn’t enforce the rules, you can always elect new Board members that will enforce the rules. It really is that simple. Hope that help!

Current Condo Owner Cited for Previous Owner’s Unapproved Modification

J.F. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I’ve owned my condo for nearly three years. I have put it on the market attempting to sell it. After posting it online, the condo company contacted me stating that my in-suite washer/dryer was never approved by the condo board (it was installed by previous owners). I was not aware of this at the time I purchased the condo. They are saying that I need to have an inspection (at my cost) to insure that it is vented correctly and to obtain signed papers stating the same to present to the board. If it is not vented properly (which I think might be the case), they told me that I need to have them removed and pay for any damage it caused to the building. I don’t think this is my responsibility as I was not made aware of any of this when I bought the condo. The condo company claims they have no record of this and no record of any of the previous owners and that it is my responsibility to find the previous owners. I hardly feel that any of this my responsibility. The realtors I bought the condo with have not been helpful in getting information on previous owners. My condo is currently on the market so I want to get this cleaned up as quickly as possible so as not to deter potential buyers. Shall I get a lawyer involved?

Mister Condo replies:

J.F., I am sorry to say that you are likely on the hook for this previous owner’s unapproved washer/dryer installation, regardless of your lack of knowledge. You are the owner of record when the violation was cited and, as such, you are the person who needs to put your unit back in conformance with the association. You may have a case to sue the previous owner for making an unapproved modification to their unit but that is likely going to be a futile effort. I’d rather see you focus your resources on getting your unit in compliance as quickly as possible so that you can make an unencumbered sale to a new owner. I can’t imagine that this process is going to be terribly expensive but, nevertheless, if you think you can track down a previous owner and bring a suit against them for your damages, I wouldn’t discourage you as long as there was enough money at risk to make it worth your while. Otherwise, follow the association’s instructions for putting your unit in compliance, make your sale, and move on. All the best!

How to Enforce a Condo Rule Violation

E.P. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

How do I write a letter to a resident about removing commercial vehicles off the condominium grounds? Commercial vehicles are not allowed on property and is indicated in Docs.

Mister Condo replies:

E.P., enforcing the association’s rules about commercial vehicle parking is a simple enough task. It is no different than enforcing any other rule of the association. Typically, a letter is sent to the unit owner describing the complaint against the unit owner and the subsequent rule of the association that was broken. The unit owner is usually summoned to appear before the Board and explain why they broke the rule or deny they broke the rule. Then the Board takes action as outlined in the documents. That is usually a fine for breaking the rule and instructions to the unit owner to please not break the rule again. Alternatively, if it is a first offense, the Board may choose to simply issue a warning. Hope that help. Good luck!

Condo Cannot Enforce Rules on Land it Doesn’t Own

J.J. from Michigan writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Our condo association rules state “No Signs of any kind with the exception of one For Sale sign”. With that being said, since all of our roads are county roads and not private roads, can the association stop me from putting political signs in the county road right of way in our subdivision? This is property that is not owned by any association member but the county right of way that is owned by the county road commission. Thank you! I need a quick answer.

Mister Condo replies:

J.J., quite simply the condo can only enforce rules on land that it owns. If you are certain that they don’t own the land you wish to plant signs on then they cannot enforce their rules on that land. However, the land owner of the land in question may have their own rules about what the public can and cannot do on that land. Have you checked with the county road commission? Violating your condo rules can get you a warning or a fine. Violating municipal rules could get you arrested. Better to be safe than sorry. Find out who owns the land and what the rules are for posting political signs before you take any other action.  All the best!