Tag Archives: Rules Enforcement

Service Animals at the Condo Pool!

A.F. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

We are a pet friendly condo. However, we do have common areas like our pool deck that does not allow pets. I like dogs but more and more residents are turning up on the pool deck with their ESA dogs, its turning into a dog park – the condo management don’t know if they can enforce the pool deck rules and ask the ESA dogs to leave?

Mister Condo replies:

A.F., this is an area where the association needs to tread lightly. Service animals are not pets and, unfortunately for the association, are not subject to the same restrictions that the association can place on pets. There are a lot of lawsuits based upon discrimination of people with ESAs. The association doesn’t want to become embroiled in such a lawsuit. I am not an attorney and offer no legal advice here. However, I would be remiss in my friendly advice duties if I didn’t tell you that you should speak with an attorney verse in both association law and service animal laws in your state to make sure the association doesn’t misstep. There may be reasonable accommodations that can be made that allow the folks with service animals to enjoy the common amenities while not imposing on the rights of the other users. I am not saying it will be a perfect solution but there may be a way to accommodate the desires of all. Get the advice of the association attorney and enjoy your amenities, without creating a lawsuit. Good luck!

Can Hot Tub Be Installed in Condo’s Limited Common Area?

D.S. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Are hot tubs allowed in a lanai that is limited common area?

Mister Condo replies:

D.S., it depends on the rules for use of limited common areas at your association. If the documents specifically state that unit owners may not modify any limited common area, then my answer would be “no”. However, since limited common areas are for the exclusive use of the assigned unit owner, I can see where an association might allow it. Additionally, there should be an agreement between the association and the unit owner about the ownership, style, and upkeep of the hot tub. After all, the association shouldn’t face any liability from an owner added amenity. On the flip side, the association could ban hot tubs or any other owner added amenities which would prevent a unit owner from installing a hot tub on a limited common element. It all comes down to the governing documents and the Board’s interpretation of the documents and attitude about allowing owner added amenities. All the best!

Condo Landlord Thwarted by Pet Ownership for Renter Rules

J.C. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Master Deed By-laws state only one pet per condo. House Rules state one pet per condo and then states no renters can have pets. Paragraph two speaks of renters having no pets. Paragraph three speaks of lessees needing to provide 2 references. Our lessee has one pet. POA wants to fine us because they say the House Rules say no pets for renters. I believe someone signing a lease for longer than 30 days is considered a lessee, not a renter. How do I fight this without an attorney? Thank you.

Mister Condo replies:

J.C., I am sorry you find yourself at odds with your association over the pet rental rules. The terms “renters” and “lessees” are generally interchangeable so it would appear that your documents are in conflict with themselves. This is actually not that uncommon as many associations simply use a boilerplate as a basis for their documents. If there were no verbiage about the pet restrictions on renters, I would say you are in the clear. However, even though it appears to be in conflict with an earlier statement on the subject, the fact that there is a restriction on pets for renters elsewhere in the document, I would say you will not be successful in challenging the association’s position. You can challenge the association by filing suit, seeking arbitration, or whatever other method of dispute settlement is available to you. However, if you do not wish to hire an attorney, you will do so on your own. The association on the other hand would likely use the services of an attorney to defend themselves. In my non-lelgal opinion, the association will prevail. Good luck!

Antiquated Condo Parking Lot System Ineffective and Unenforceable

C.S. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

The Manager of my Condominium does not exercise any control about the occupancy of the scarce parking lots. All these spots are numbered and some others (each for one each) and others are for visitors (without numbers), that is for the first that arrive. Can the owners know the parking spot numbers belonging to all others owners? Then we (the owners) can make a match to them and find abusive neighbors. There are many people that duplicate the hang tags or recycle from the former tenants and even have numbers that not matching with the numbers on the parking lots. The manager has mentioned that the number of each parking lot belong to the “privacy information”. Is this true?

Mister Condo replies:

C.S., it sounds like your association is using a very poor system of parking lot management. While it may fall to the Property Manager to enforce this system, I would complain to the Board that their system is ineffective and being rampantly abused by residents. All the Board needs to do is adopt a modern parking lot solution to get the problem under control. If they refuse to do that then the chaos will continue. Privacy issues are a legitimate concern and many people are not fond of outsiders (burglars, for instance) entering a property and inspecting vacant parking lot numbers to determine who is and isn’t at home. Vacant space equals a vacant unit. That might encourage a burglar to attempt a break-in. Many associations use alternate parking space assignments for just this reason. My advice is for you to write to the Board and ask them to modernize the parking lot assignment system. Then, the Property Manager is far more likely to be successful in enforcing the rules of the new system. All the best!

Two for One: Condo Parking Space Rental

A.Z. from Brooklyn, NY writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I have a condo in Brooklyn. The condo has parking spot. I believe it is in my deed. Do I have the right to rent my parking spot? Thank you.

AND

E.P. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I need your help. I live in 3-unit condo. The condo is self-managed. I have a parking space, which belongs to me but I do not have a car. My neighbor, who doesn’t live in our condo, is parking his car in my parking space with my permission. One of our neighbors, who lives in our condo said, that this is an unauthorized car and it should be removed. May I allow to parking any car on my parking lot if it is a part of my property? Thank you!

Mister Condo replies:

A.Z. and E.P., unless your association governing documents prevent it (many do, especially in high-density urban markets, so be sure you check your governing documents), you may have the right to rent your space. The reason many associations ban parking space rental is that it can create a potential problem for the association who owns the parking lots. Technically, your parking space rental enterprise sets up business on the common grounds, which is generally prohibited. What happens if the renter decides to sue you if their car is damaged in the space. Who can you rent to? Will it be another owner or someone who is looking for long-term vehicle storage? Can the renter sue the association if there is a problem? Rather than set themselves up for possible problems like these, may associations simply deny the rental of parking spaces. Check your documents. Ask the Board or Property Manager if you aren’t sure. Don’t be surprised if the answer is “no”. Good luck!

Condo Electronic Key Deactivated by Property Manager

O.P. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

The property manager disconnected my electronic key because I authorized a person HE DOESNT LIKE IT to enter to my property as desired.

Mister Condo replies:

O.P., I am sorry that your electronic key privileges were revoked. Without knowing the rules of how your electronic keys are allowed to be used, I am not certain if sharing it with anyone is allowed, let alone a person disliked by the Property Manager. I doubt the Property Manager can simply disable a key without having to report such activity to the Board, to whom the Property Manager must answer. If you feel your key was deactivated inappropriately, complain to the Board so they can take action. On the other hand, if you have violated the rules of the electronic key use by sharing the code with someone who you shouldn’t have shared it with, I would advise you not to do it again. I assume the reason there are electronic keys in the first place is to provide building security. They are convenient to be sure but must be protected if they are to be useful as a security measure. All the best!

Condo Owner’s Guest Flagrantly Violates Parking Rules

L.W. from Fairfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Our parking rules state that “no vehicles may be stored in common parking spaces when not in use. Vehicles that are not operable or that will not be utilized for 15 days or longer should be parked in the Unit Owners garage or driveway.” The live-in boyfriend of a unit owner has parked his beat up pickup truck in a parking spot in the common area for more than one month. It has not budged in a month. I requested our Management Company ask that he move the truck weeks ago, but it has not moved. The owner of the truck is NOT an owner in this complex, just a friend of one. The truck owner has a new truck which he parks near the old one, indicating to me that he is merely storing this unused truck in one of our common area parking places. It is infuriating that they are being allowed to do this. What do you suggest?

Mister Condo replies:

L.W., the use and management of the common parking areas is the purview of the Board. It is up to them to enforce the rules of the association. Your duty is to report those parking violations that you observe to the Board. It is then up to the Board to take the appropriate action. You can follow up with the Board to see what they are doing but that is the limit of what you can do. The Property Manager can only do what the Board empowers him or her to do. While your by-laws state the intended use of the parking lot they may not say what, specifically, can be done to unit owners or guests who do not comply. Typically, fines are issued after warnings are given. In extreme cases, the Board may have the authority to tow the vehicle off property. Whatever the rules are, all you can do as a resident is to report the offense. It is up to the Board to deal with the problem. All the best!

Cantankerous Condo Renter Unhappy at Condo

B.C. from Florida writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

The condo president is a nightmare. The Board is a nightmare. This condo is intentionally making it difficult for guests to get in and out of the building. The intention is increased security but it is just increased harassment. If a nurse or CNA visits every day, calling the gate every day is absurd. They get too many phone calls and don’t have time to make parking passes for the number of visitors we have during the winter. Disabled parking is not required for condos in FL — but they have a sign saying that if a resident parks in a guest spot (even with a handicap sticker) the car will be towed. There is a sign saying I can be fined for drinking water while swimming. Funny thing is….they have no one to enforce any rules or call the tow company so the folks who rent here ignore the rules and the board and work everything out with the parking amongst ourselves. I cannot be evicted by a condo board and my landlord will never evict me. They can’t “put pressure” on the landlord because he will ignore them. I have spoken with the President of the Rec Center and he sees my side but refuses to hire his incompetent manager who is the cause of ALL problems here. I never agreed to follow any rules. I don’t even have a written lease anymore….because my landlord trusts me. If the Board of this condo refuses to let in my guests, I will either have a panic attack and call the police or I will insult someone who will then hit me and then I will file battery charges. Can I file a law suit against the Condo Board for discrimination against the disabled? The manager is hated here…how do I get her fired without ending up in jail myself?

Mister Condo replies:

B.C., I can’t for the life of me understand why you would live in a place that is so out of touch with your living needs. A condominium is not an assisted living center and the association is under no obligation to change its rules to suit your needs. You, and everyone else, need to follow the rules of the community. The Board, democratically elected by all unit owners, including your landlord, conducts the business of the association as it sees fit but does have to answer to unit owners at annual elections. If they aren’t doing their jobs they are likely to be voted off the Board. That doesn’t seem to be the case from what you have told me. Your lack of lease agreement with your landlord does not exempt you from the rules of the community. In fact, my guess is that your landlord is in violation of the rules for renting units by not having a written agreement with you on file with the association. You claim you can’t be evicted by the association but without a valid rental agreement to defend yourself, I am not so sure you are correct. You would be unwise to do anything illegal such as verbally assault any of the Board members or Property Manager at your condo. You would do well to speak with your own attorney and see what, if any, legal rights you have. From what you have told me here, I don’t see where any laws are being violated but I am not an attorney and offer no legal advice here. You might consider moving to a more suitable community when your lease ends, whenever that is (who knows with an unwritten lease?). Whatever you decide to do, I wish you a happier condo life experience. All the best!

No Enforcement of Condo Parking Rules Leads to Chaos for Condo Resident

L.T. from New Haven County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I have requested for past 5 years to move my parking spot. I rent (by choice) and I am allowed 1 marked spot and 1 visitor spot. I have the only spot parked under a tree. My car gets ruined every day by bird droppings it has ruined the paint on my car and is costing me a small fortune at the car wash. This is not my original spot as you can clearly see on the pavement it was changed. I drive an SUV and I am boxed in by car in front of me and one behind me. Almost every day I come home and someone is in my spot. It clearly should be visitor spot with the one behind me. Gas Co., Comcast , pizza delivery. etc.. So, I park in my visitor spot instead of honking my horn. I also take photos to document. I receive “fines” from condo board for parking in visitor spot. Clearly someone has nothing else to do. Nor have they asked “why” am I supposed to run out all night to check if they left. And it seems to only apply to renters. I also am disabled suffer from migraines. All this exacerbates my condition dealing w/ this every day. Seems there is one set of bylaws for owners and another for renters. I am now submitting a reasonable request. I cannot get an answer why this is such a problem? Just switch my spot. They did it for previous owner. I can go on and on example nobody parks in front of their garage as the bylaws state, parking spaces are not the same length, etc….

Mister Condo replies:

L.T., I am sorry you are having such parking difficulties at your condo apartment. Residents of condominium associations are supposed to voluntarily follow rules such as parking rules because they wish to live in an orderly community. Clearly, your fellow residents have no desire to do so which means the Board needs to intervene and enforce the rules. Sending you fines for violating the rules is one way in which they can attempt to impose order. However, they need to fine all offenders, not just you. If you are being unfairly singled out, you may have a case for a discrimination claim against the association. You should seek the advice of an attorney to see if that is plausible. Other than that, there isn’t too much you can do as an individual. You a should complain to the Board each and every time a parking violation is observed. The Board is under no obligation to move your space although you are free to continue to ask. My guess is this is a classic case of the squeaky wheel getting the grease. Be thorough, be consistent, and continue to document the parking violations and report them in timely fashion to the Board. Appear at the Board meetings to voice your complaints. If the Board is unable to fulfill its duty and provide your parking as it does other residents, you will be left with only two other options. Again, you can speak with an attorney to see if there is a legal case to be made or you can move to another apartment where parking may not be such an ordeal. Good luck!

Noisy Condo Neighbor Serves On the Board and Doesn’t Follow Rules

W.T. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I have been having a problem with the owner of the Condo above me. I have asked him several times to try and cut down the noise on his floor (walking, dropping heavy objects, etc.t) which makes noise come down into my condo. He also has a Doberman dog that sometimes barks 30 or more minutes at a time. Yesterday, I talked with him and asked if he would try to cut down on the noise. I have done this before with some results. Yesterday when I asked the question, he came unglued, telling me not to speak to him again and a few other choice words. I feel that if he continues to make excessive noise, I should be able to ask him to try and keep the noise down. What else can or should I do? Also, this person is one of our directors and the other two goes along with him.

Mister Condo replies:

W.T., I am sorry for your problems and for your inconsiderate upstairs neighbor. I am going to give you two answers for your consideration. The first is to write to the Board with as much supporting documentation to describe the noise and the rules violations being committed by your upstairs neighbor. Almost all condos have rules about noise and the rights to a peaceable environment for all residents. Further, almost all have rules about pets and the acceptable noise level and noise curation that other residents have to tolerate. A 30-minute session of any dog barking is sure to be a rule violation. In the past, you have taken a neighborly approach with some success. Speaking with an agreeable neighbor is a great start but that is no longer an option. Your neighbor has made it clear he has no intention of keeping the noise down. Your recourse is with the other members of the Board, his fellow Directors. If they are reluctant to take action against your neighbor, you have two practical options. First, you can sue the Board for neglecting to enforce the noise covenants of the association. Your second option is to move out of this community. It is unfortunate that it has come to this but having a jerk for a neighbor is not only annoying, it can be downright dangerous. Having a jerk like this neighbor on your Board is equally dangerous, especially if his fellow Board members are reluctant to enforce the rules against him. I am sorry I don’t have better news for you. Keep me posted and good luck!