Tag Archives: Voting

Condo Board Refuses to Hold Annual Meeting!

J.W. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Our condo association elects board members at the annual association meeting. The current board will not schedule the annual election. The current board just keeps making decisions. How can a non-board member force the board to schedule an annual meeting so that new board members can be elected? The By-Laws call for the annual meeting to be held in April and they must give a minimum of 21 days’ notice.

Mister Condo replies:

J.W., if your Board is operating outside of the governing documents (it sure sounds like they are), you can do a few things to correct the situation. First, you can speak with other unit owners and call a Special Meeting of the unit owners following the method to do so outlined in your governing documents. This requires some organizational skills on your part and you do need to follow the proper procedures to do so. Your goal in this meeting would be to recall the current Board (essentially remove them from office) and replace them with better volunteer leaders who will follow the rules of governance for the association. This is serious business and I would even recommend that you speak with an attorney who specializes in community association law to guide you. This will cost money but is worth every penny, in my opinion. Your second option is to sue the Board for not following the governance rules of the association. This option may force the annual meeting but will do little to remove the Board members who are not following the rules. Your third option is to leave this community. That is a drastic measure but if you can’t find better volunteer leaders to run this association, you can either live with the out of rule-breaking Board or sell your unit. Communities get the Boards they deserve. If your fellow unit owners aren’t outraged that this Board isn’t operating by the rules, it is time to leave. It is only a matter of time before more than missed meetings are unearthed. Boards that operate in this renegade fashion are usually breaking multiple rules. This can cost every member of the association dearly in their pocketbook if left unchecked. You have your work carved out for you. Good luck!

Condo Board Divided Not Getting Work Done

R.G. from Florida writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

My board can’t agree on replacing security cameras. Meanwhile we have no cameras. Our pool is also closed since November for structural repairs. Five members can’t agree on anything or even get a quorum. I want to know what can I do?

Mister Condo replies:

R.G., other than running for the Board yourself or electing folks that work better together, there isn’t anything you can do. Board members are volunteer leaders from within your community and are democratically elected by you and the other unit owners in your association. They are charged with conducting the business of the association but they don’t have to get along or agree on anything, kind of like members of Congress! Unlike members of Congress, they aren’t compensated for their work but that doesn’t mean they can ignore the wishes of their constituents! My advice is to look at the Minutes of the Board meetings this past year and find out how the members are voting. If you don’t like what you see, organize more like-minded candidates to run for the Board. Perhaps you should consider running? That way, you’ll have a ringside seat to see what is causing these delays. Otherwise, my guess is you can expect more of the same. Good luck!

No Elections Held for Years at this Condo!

P.A. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

What if no new elections have taken place for several years? Can board members just keep voting selves in?

Mister Condo replies:

P.A., unchallenged, a seated Board can do a lot of things, including behave outside the rules of governance for the association. Your documents clearly state how elections to the Board are held. Most require annual meetings of the shareholders (unit owners) at which time two very important things should happen. The adoption of the Annual Budget which sets out the common fee schedule and how the money will be spent throughout the year and the election of Board members are the two things that generally must happen. If there are no unit owners coming to these meetings and no unit owners looking to serve, guess what happens? The seated Board is free to do just about whatever they want because there is no one to stop them from continuing to serve on the Board. As long as the association’s bills are getting paid and no one is pushing back on the common fees it would appear as the other unit owners are content to let things be. This is an incredibly dangerous situation and a condominium association I couldn’t get out of fast enough but it does happen. When you purchase into a condominium association you are actually purchasing into a corporation. If you don’t care what happens to your investment you don’t have to pay attention to how the corporation is run. The same is true in a condominium. If you and your fellow unit owners are ready to challenge the sitting board, I would suggest you all attend the Annual Meeting this year and get ready to run for office. It is an unpaid, volunteer position but it is vital to the healthy running of the association. Even if you are not elected to serve, the fact that unit owners like you are paying attention may be all this Board needs to offer more transparency. Shame on any association member who doesn’t care enough about how the corporation is run to not pay attention to something as important as this. They will have no one to blame but themselves if the association is poorly run or money goes missing. Good luck!

Condo Board Unwilling to Maintain and Upkeep Common Grounds

J.W. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

The association refuses to repair muddy spots in my lawn. They are from the clay dirt and require maintenance.

Mister Condo replies:

J.W., maintenance and upkeep of common areas are the purview of the Board. I assume the area you are describing as “my lawn” is, in fact, common ground. The Board is not actually under any obligation to do anything although most would want the association landscaping to be in good shape so as to increase curb appeal and unit owner enjoyment of the property. If your Board has no interest in the maintenance or upkeep of the property, it is time for a new Board. Perhaps, you would like to serve? Ask the Board to make the repair, not just to the portion of the common grounds that abut your unit but to all of the common grounds. If they are unwilling, find better candidates to serve on the Board and vote the current Board out at your next election. All the best!

Michigan Condo Owner Seeks to Replace Board Members and Access Association Records

J.T. from Michigan writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

This is in the state of Michigan: What percentage of signed owners (in agreement) are needed to release the current board members? And, replace? How does an owner or owners (#) demand to receive current and past (3 years) bills (invoices) for services, including the property management company and accounting?

Mister Condo replies:

J.T., since I am neither an expert in Michigan condo law nor an attorney, I posed your question to a group of friends who do practice community association law in your state. This is not to be construed as legal advice. It is just some friendly advice to guide you on your way. You may wish to seek your own legal opinion and/or hire an attorney to guide you on your path. Here is what my friend had to offer:

In Michigan, the ability to remove a director(s) is typically governed by the association bylaws a/k/a the corporate bylaws. Depending on the age of the governing documents, the condominium bylaws and the association bylaws may be merged into one document. Therefore, the first place to look would be in the association bylaws, which usually has a procedure to remove a director. In addition, most condominium associations are nonprofit corporations and the Michigan Nonprofit Corporation Act also has provisions regarding removing a director. See MCL 450.2511 and MCL 450.2514.

In order to demand current and past bills, the individual would need to send a demand for inspection of records letter. The letter can be sent under the 1) Nonprofit Corporation Act, 2) the Michigan Condominium Act and/or 3) the Condominium Bylaws. As an attorney, my firm routinely handles such requests.

That sounds like solid advice to me, J.T.! All the best!

Small Condo; Big Governance Problem!

J.P. from Florida writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

I live in a small condo association in Florida. While being a new owner, I have noticed that the whole board and the running of the property is out of control. The President has been in place for several years as I can tell since no one else wanted to be on the board. It is a 55+ community. He also put himself as the property manager. The budget is less than $100K, so no property management company is required. He does not pay any HOA fees as he says that is in lieu of his property manager position. The association never voted for this, he just took this over on his own. He bullies the owners who are old and some do not speak good English. When he gets mad at you, he is very vindictive and knocks on people’s doors late at night. This guy is in his 70’s and a heavy drinker. I voted myself onto the board recently as Treasurer to have a voice and he has yet to hand over the books, check writing, etc. Many people believe he is hiding stuff and he now refuses to answer his door or calls from me. He feels threatened and believes I will expose what he has been doing the past 5 years or so. What do you recommend the best course of action to get control of the situation? I have spoken to the association’s lawyer who says to file a complaint with the state (Florida), I plan to do so in hopes of getting the ball rolling to have him removed. We also have cameras throughout the property which he installed but he is the only one who has control of them as it is set up in his unit. Many people feel uncomfortable as he watches all day and approaches people when they get home. I have to assume that is not legal as when we ask to see a clip he does not allow it. As you can see this place is a mess and would be happy to hear any suggestions you may have before I contact the state. Thank you for your advice.

Mister Condo replies:

J.P., there is very little that I can add before you contact the state, which I hope you have already done. The association attorney can only do as much as the association (the Board) instructs him or her to do. You do need to review your governance documents (or have the attorney review them for you) to see what steps will be necessary to remove the President from office and from the Board. If funds are missing or misappropriated, there may very well be criminal charges as well. Right off the bat, I can tell you that the association should go after the unpaid common fees. Board members are not exempt from common fees and unless there is some kind of formal agreement between the President and the Association for him to serve as a paid Property Manager, he will have to make good on those unpaid fees as well as any late fees. Shame on your fellow unit owners who took no action until now. From what you have said, this behavior has been going on for years. Who knows what financial perils this person has brought upon the association. What about other Board members? Are there none? This situation stinks to high heaven and you are correct to pursue a remedy for you and all of the other unit owners are at serious financial risk as long as this individual has the association checkbook. The time for action is now. Good luck!

Condo President Increases Number of Board Members

K.S. from Illinois writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Our by-laws read 5 elected board members. Our president through the last few years has increased to 9 without approval of the membership. Can this be right?

Mister Condo replies:

K.S., appointing additional Board Members is not likely a “power” that the Board President has. At least, I am not familiar with condo governing documents that allow for the Board to increase in size beyond the stated number of directors. If your documents call for 5 Board members, then that is all there should be. If the by-laws have been revised through a vote of the unit owners to allow for more Board Members than the stated 5, that is a different matter altogether. You also didn’t mention how these new Board members were selected. Did the unit owners vote them all into office? Did the President simply appoint them? Board Members are meant to be democratically elected representatives of the association. They are not meant to be appointees of the President. If you suspect foul play at your association, you may wish to write to the Board and reference the documentation that states only 4 Board members and allow them to explain how 5 became 9. If you aren’t happy with their answer and you feel they are violating the rules of governance, your next step is a lawsuit to force them to comply. However, I would caution you to only do this if you suspect foul play. If the association is running fine and unit owners seem content, you may simply wish to keep an eye on the situation and make sure the 9 Board Members are being democratically elected. Good luck!

Legality of Condo Board Voting by Email

M.H. from outside of Connecticut writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Can a condo board vote by email when an issue needs resolving quickly?

Mister Condo replies:

M.H., without knowing exactly where you are from, it is impossible for me to give you a definitive answer. You need to refer to your condo governance documents (many were written before email was prevalent so they say nothing about it) and your state laws on community associations. Many have adopted email as a valid method of allowing votes provided the email records are kept as association records and the results of any votes held between Board meetings are properly documented in the Minutes of the next meeting, As long as that protocol is being followed and no laws are being broken, it is entirely likely that the Board can vote on issues via email between Board meetings. Thanks for the question!

Condo Board Vacancy Filled; Volunteer Overlooked

C.W. from Florida writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

If a condo Board has a 5-member Board and one resigns, and a new homeowner elects to offer his services for the Board to fill that seat and the remaining 4 Board Members decline to allow that member to become a Board member but would select another homeowner who does not want to be a Board Member and it is personal and they do not allow the one volunteering his services simply because they do not like him, is this collusion, unethical?

Mister Condo replies:

C.W., I would say it is unfortunate but not unethical. Your governing documents spell out how the Board can fill a vacancy. Typically, it is completely up to the Board to make the appointment. Just because there is a willing volunteer from the association looking to be appointed, the Board is not obligated to do so. In a small association like yours, I would simply suggest that the eager volunteer get on the ballot for the next election. At that time, it is up to the unit owners, not just the Board. All the best!

Condo Developer Transition Turmoil

S.C. from Litchfield County writes:

Dear Mister Condo,

Our Board does nothing. No communication, they don’t respond to our questions very well, they are not transparent when they communicate among each other (which is not too often) and my biggest beef, they refuse to fix our crumbling infrastructure (roads, outside siding, fascia boards, etc.). It’s one delay, one excuse after another and this has been going on for almost 3 years. Money is tight, they do not properly fund our community yet they are raising the dues and still operating with a negative balance. No one on the board lives here full-time and the president and one other member work for the developer. Clearly, their priorities are not in sync with the homeowners. Most residents will not say a word for fear of being the bad one or simply a case of extreme apathy. I want to round up the troops and have all the board members (well, 3 out of 4) removed. Having been the president of the association and property manager, I have plenty of experience.  I do not know what kind of reaction I will get but I do know there will be some support. Any response from you would be great and I look forward to it. Thank you.

Mister Condo replies:

S.C., I am sorry that your condo Board is not performing to your expectations. However, from what you have told me, the association is still under developer control so the Board truly has limited power during this time period. Once control is handed over to the association, things will change because no one will be beholden to the developer. The association governs itself and many of the items you discuss can be addressed through democratic elections of interested and able volunteers. Now, if the developer has broken covenants with the owners and you think a lawsuit is in order, you might want to discuss your situation with an attorney. However, new owners like you describe may not go along with spending money to sue the developer so you may just need to wait until the developer transition period is complete. If I have misread your letter and the developer transition is already complete, you simply need to elect new leaders for your community. You will need volunteers ready, able, and willing to serve. They will need training and support. You should also consider hiring a community association attorney verse in developer transition, and accountant, and a property manager if needed. The developer’s team was there to support the developer, not the community association. Getting the right folks in place is vitally important to your association’s success. Your local CAI Chapter can help you find the resources you need. Visit http://caict.org to learn more. Good luck!